cauterize

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Related to cauterised: cautery

cauterize

 [kaw´ter-īz]
to apply a cautery; to perform cauterization.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cau·ter·ize

(kaw'ter-īz),
To apply a cautery; to burn with a cautery.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cauterize

(kô′tə-rīz′)
tr.v. cauter·ized, cauter·izing, cauter·izes
1. To burn or sear with a cautery.
2. To deaden, as to feelings or moral scruples; callous.

cau′ter·i·za′tion (-tər-ĭ-zā′shən) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cauterize

verb To stop bleeding with high heat or a chemical–eg, silver nitrate
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cau·ter·ize

(kaw'tĕr-īz)
To apply a cautery; to burn with a cautery.
Synonym(s): cauterise.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Cauterize

To use heat or chemicals to stop bleeding, prevent the spread of infection, or destroy tissue.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cau·ter·ize

(kaw'tĕr-īz)
To apply a cautery; to burn with a cautery.
Synonym(s): cauterise.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients in whom a single, prominent bleeding site was localised and cauterised did not rebleed and were discharged the following morning.
But the wound was cauterised so there was no bleeding.
Nicholls (right), who first revealed news of the surgery late on Saturday night, was present at Wincanton, where Denman, second in the Cheltenham Gold Cup for the last two years, was set his biggest physical test since vet Geoff Lane cauterised the palate of the 11-year-old, who in September 2008 was treated for a fibrillating heart.
And after leaving loose ends not just tied up but cauterised, we're left with a dazzling hook, baited with another humdinger of a plot twist guaranteed to reel viewers back in for Damages' return.
He will probably have his palate cauterised again but with that he would be ready to run after two or three weeks so Cheltenham is still on the agenda.
If fibrillation is serious, a ring of muscle where the vessel enters the heart can be cauterised. The scar forms a barrier to these signals so that they can't reach the heart muscle.
With his catchphrase "Time me gentlemen, time me," this 19th-century surgeon amputated limbs, cauterised wounds and left only neatly sewn-up stumps in just 28 seconds.
"Essentially, he has had his palate cauterised. It's an operation where they only miss four or five days of work, and then they're back in again.
The doctor cauterised and stitched her ears and gave her painkillers."
"But we had it cauterised and I haven't heard him make a noise in his work this autumn.
He has had the inside of his nose cauterised four or five times but to no avail.