cause

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cause

(kawz),
That which produces an effect or condition; that by which a morbid change or disease is brought about.
[L. causa]

cause

Law & medicine That which creates a condition or results in an effect. See Immediate cause of death, Necessary cause, Proximate cause, Sufficient cause, Underlying cause of death.

Patient discussion about cause

Q. What Causes Dizziness? My husband is 55 years old. Lately he's been experiencing dizziness when he gets up from sitting for a while. What could be the cause?

A. We often feel dizzy when we are very tired, however real dizziness could indicate on a variety of problems: neurological, cardiovascular (for instance low blood pressure), nutritional (for example lack of glucose), dehydration and more. When someone complains about experiencing dizziness when getting up from sitting or lying down, the cause is usually a sudden drop in blood pressure (called orthostatic hypotension).

Q. What causes dizziness? I’m a 55 years old woman with 2 children, and in the last few weeks I have a feeling of dizziness every time I stand up from my bed. What cause this feeling? Does it mean I have some serious thing? I also have hypertension and diabetes that are usually stable.

A. If this feeling appears solely on standing up, it maybe related to drugs you take to treat your hypertension (It’s called “orthostatic hypertension”). You should report this to your doctor and maybe changing your treatment can make this feeling disappear.

Q. What causes asthma? My 5 year old son has trouble breathing sometimes after he runs around too much. My friend suggested he might have asthma. What causes this disease?

A. Another consideration is that food sensitivities can exacerbate asthma.
http://www.diagnose-me.com/cond/C118126.html

More discussions about cause
References in periodicals archive ?
In Marco Mincoff, Things Supernatural and Causeless: Shakespearean Romance.
Every wanton, or causeless, or unnecessary act of authority, exerted, or authorized, or encouraged by the legislature over the citizens, is wrong, and unjustifiable, and tyrannical: for every citizen is, of right, entitled to liberty, personal as well as mental, in the highest possible degree, which can consist with the safety and welfare of the state.
People with a hereditary predisposition, those who began to suddenly feel a causeless fatigue, rapid weight gain (or its deficit) and depression.
that expressed in Christopher Kutz, Causeless Complicity, 1 CRIM.
Essentially sharing Sacks's distress, Buber asserted that "only an internal revolution can have the power to heal our people of their sickness of causeless hatred....
The market trip leading to his employment with Mailer is represented as a causeless whim rather than a legitimate need for groceries, a propitious intuition rather than mundane event.
As Elsie learns, the Civil War, "which had seemed to her a wicked, cruel, and causeless rebellion, was the one inevitable thing in our growth from a loose group of sovereign states to a United Nation" (149).
When the farmer ceases to participate, the custom loses its meaning, and Bloomfield laments the social changes that have threatened the laborers' interests, leaving hierarchy in place while undermining the farmer's paternalism: Such were the days,--of days long past I sing, When Pride gave place to mirth without a sting; Ere tyrant customs strength sufficient bore To violate the feelings of the poor; To leave them distanc'd in the mad'ning race, Where'er refinement shows its hated face: Nor causeless hated;--'tis the peasant's curse, That hourly makes his wretched station worse; Destroys life's intercourse; the social plan That rank to rank cements, as man to man.
Derrida's argument would be that to locate the effect of grace in texts would not necessarily invoke a causeless cause ....
Envy and causeless hatred do characterize the human race, just as cooperation and harmony do.
Whatever comes your way, this causeless joy will hold."
In this paper Hye-Kyung Kim argues for a novel, deflationary interpretation of that chapter: Aristotle's main concern is to argue for the causeless unity of the definitions of form and of composite substance.