cause-specific mortality rate

cause-specific mortality rate

Epidemiology The mortality rate from a specified cause for a population; the numerator is the number of deaths attributed to a specific cause during a specified time interval; the denominator is the size of the population at the midpoint of the time interval
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Our study objectives were to 1) describe causes of death in our population and identify any potential covariates, with particular attention to age because it is a known risk factor for severe disease; 2) compare all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates with those of the underlying Texas population by using standardized mortality ratios (SMRs); and 3) examine yearly deaths for WNV-infected case-patients as they progress through time.
In our general survival analysis (Bender et al., 2012), we did not discriminate between disease-related mortality factors when estimating cause-specific mortality rates. Separating the disease-related causes-of-mortality in Bender et al.
Cause-specific mortality rates in children aged <5 years by subdistrict, CoCT, 2001-2004 and 2010-2013.
Further, since multiple outcomes and subgroups were examined, clinicians should interpret cause-specific mortality rates with caution.
We also focused on the contiguous United States because the numbers of counties with available cause-specific mortality rates were small in Hawaii and Alaska.
Cause-specific mortality rates, allowing for multiple causes of death, were calculated for 4-year intervals because of the small numbers of events (Table 2).
Frequencies, percentages, cause-specific mortality rates and proportional mortality ratios (PMRs) were used to describe the differences in self-harm mortality by sex, age group, highest level of education, province of death, and pregnancy status among females.
All-cause and cause-specific mortality rates, as well as standardized mortality rates, are still good indicators for ascertaining the public health effects of a given disease and assessing trends in incidence.
Cause-specific mortality rates of radio-marked female and male moose > 1 year old calculated using the Kaplan-Meier (1958) method for estimating survival and cause-specific mortality rates in south-central Sweden during 1994-1997.
We calculated cause-specific mortality rates for each of the three agents each season and year using program MICROMORT (Heisey and Fuller, 1985).
Cause-specific mortality rates, published in the Monthly Vital Statistics Report by the National Center for Health Statistics, are estimated from a systematic sample of 10% of death certificates received in state vital statistics offices during a 1-month period using the underlying cause of death recorded on the certificate.