causation

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causation

Cause & effect Law & medicine 1. In the context of disability evaluation, where a particular condition might be linked to the workplace; medical definition of causation requires valid scientific proof; legal definition requires either a probability of > 50% or that the event was more likely than not to be causative. See Pulmonary function test Malpractice The establishment of a cause-and-effect relationship between an allegedly negligent act and the purported injuries. See Malpractice, Negligence.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the tort causation analysis, the causal chain would be broken because the judge made an independent determination of probable cause.
This means that an independent causation analysis should likely be an
Through the review of the existing literature, it has been discovered that past researches on the causation analysis of traffic accidents are gradually evolving from the descriptive simple analysis based on aggregated models to the multivariable complex modeling analysis based on disaggregated models.
Simulation based on our proposed accident causation analysis method is described in Section 5.
The widespread use of event studies to determine whether there has been ex post price distortion for purposes of loss causation analysis raises the question of whether event studies are also appropriate in analyzing ex ante price distortion.
in proximate causation analysis is one of its main advantages over the
The court found that the plaintiffs' expert evidence was insufficient to support a traditional proximate causation analysis, that but for defendants' negligence Turner would have been cured.
Among other things, Washington charges that the measures are based on an injury and causation analysis covering only six months of data for each of the years examined, and that they are not based on objective examinations of the volume of dumped imports, the effect of those imports on prices in the domestic market of like products, and the impact of the imports on domestic producers of those products.
(6) The Third Circuit also has concluded that the "assertion that the mailings involved must themselves be relied upon by the victim of the fraud in order for a RICO claim to be established is inaccurate." (7) And the Second and Seventh circuits likewise apply a traditional proximate causation analysis, under which RICO's "by reason of" standard is deemed satisfied if the commission of the underlying predicate acts are "a substantial factor in the sequence of responsible causation, and if the injury is reasonably foreseeable or anticipated as a natural consequence." (8) Many courts embracing a flexible proximate causation analysis have done so in response to the Supreme Court's decision in Holmes v.
I tried to show by using an instance of an example developed by Lewis, (2) and strictly applying his causation analysis to it, that the analysis fails.
This inconsistency is cleared up by noting that the causation analysis is included for the sake of argument or for the sake of completeness.