causation


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causation

[kôsā′shən]
Etymology: L, causa
(in law) the existence of a reasonable connection between the misfeasance, malfeasance, or nonfeasance of the defendant and the injury or damage suffered by the plaintiff. In a lawsuit in which negligence is alleged, the harm suffered by the plaintiff must be proved to result directly from the negligence of the defendant; causation must be demonstrated.

causation

Cause & effect Law & medicine 1. In the context of disability evaluation, where a particular condition might be linked to the workplace; medical definition of causation requires valid scientific proof; legal definition requires either a probability of > 50% or that the event was more likely than not to be causative. See Pulmonary function test Malpractice The establishment of a cause-and-effect relationship between an allegedly negligent act and the purported injuries. See Malpractice, Negligence.

causation,

n the act or agency which produces an effect. See also acausal.

causation

the relation of cause to effect.

causation analysis
comparison of the rate of occurrence of the disease in animals which were exposed to the suspected agent to the occurrence rate in animals which were not so exposed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The agents use top-down causation to shape and constrain the atoms and molecules in solids, gases, and liquids which, in turn, use bottom-up causation so that the function desired by the agent emerges from the components.
One obstacle to mounting a Daubert challenge to a differential etiology opinion is that many courts have already accepted the technique as a valid method for determining causation.
The anti-concurrent causation clause thus allows the insurer to deny coverage for a loss and, in effect, circumvent concurrent causation judicial holdings.
A contrastive theory of singular causation analyses the causal relation in the following way, where A, A* and B are descriptions of singular events:
The Seventh Circuit's disregard of this principle and its extraordinary retroactive imposition of liability without proof of causation for lawful conduct dating back to the first half of the 1900s cannot survive constitutional scrutiny.
To prove causation for an off-Table injury, the claimant must establish: "(1) a medical theory causally connecting the vaccination and the injury; (2) a logical sequence of cause and effect showing that the vaccination was the reason for the injury; and (3) a showing of a proximate temporal relationship between the vaccination and the injury.
But he takes issue with Davidson's assumption that the notion of causation at stake in rational explanations has to be the same as the one used by the physical sciences (which Marcus calls "efficient causation").
Proof of causation in toxic tort litigation is an inherently difficult problem, which regularly requires time-consuming analysis of complex scientific evidence.
That exemption appears in a section under the heading "Business Claimants for Which There is No Causation Requirement.
This is in direct conflict with legal causation if treatment has been withheld or withdrawn.