causal factor


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causal factor

Medtalk A factor linked to the causation of a disease or health problem
References in periodicals archive ?
11) And we know even less about the causal factors at work in current geostrategic situations than we do about historical events.
It is unlikely that one, let alone all four, of the underlying causal factors would have been identified without input from failure analysis.
YOUTH SMOKING INITIATION AND EVALUATION OF ADVERTISING AS A CAUSAL FACTOR
Causal factors contributing to fixed-facility releases included human error resulting from mistakes made by a person handling mercury (n = 155, 66.
That, as well as attitudes toward children in general, indicate that a changing paradigm of disease was crucial before environmental toxins would be recognized as a causal factor in children's illnesses.
A letter released by the US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) dated 2 November said that Eiji Sugi, one of several Alaska Airlines employees assigned to the crash work groups, was delaying the study of lubrication, suspected to be one causal factor in the MD-80 accident, because his "lack of expertise and failure to understand and communicate technical issues have caused unnecessary work.
A physician should suspect GERD as a causal factor when asthma does not occur until late in life, when episodes occur at night, or when asthma does not respond to conventional medications.
This process will identify human error (a causal factor in 70 to 80 percent of aviation mishaps) on a near real-time basis and provide the tools to measure the effectiveness of intervention strategies.
Not surprisingly, and in keeping with the emphasis of this article, the analysis also found that the vast majority have human error as a primary causal factor.
Mr Buchan, who is also president of the Association of Scottish Police Superintendents, said: "The lack of parental guidance is definitely a causal factor in the rise of anti-social behaviour.
It's never the causal factor but it definitely plays a role.
A closer analysis of the reception of and transition between different therapies would have allowed Braslow to explore the implicit and negotiated meanings of these therapeutic interventions, rather than portray these therapeutic interventions as the causal factor that created these meanings (the author's discussion of this latter point is excellent).