caudex


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caudex

An obsolete anatomic term for a stem or stem-like structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
atrovirens aims to determine 1) caudex growth rates; 2) leaf production, expansion and senescence rates; 3) spore production and release periods; 4) the intensity of the simultaneous occurrence of each phenologic event as well as the influence of temperature, photoperiod and precipitation over it, based on the monitoring of a population in a secondary forest in southern Brazil.
Herbs, perennial, with thick, simple or fewbranched caudex. Stems 10-45 cm, erect, striate, often simple, glabrous below, strigillose above, simple or divaricately branched above.
Existe una relacion semantica estrecha entre la palabra codex o caudex y la palabra latina liber.
The fusiform caudexes were found to support one to several stems but no stolons or other asexual vegetative structures were observed.
setosa in different types of vegetation in the State of Rio Grande do Sul (Southern Brazil); the similarity of these epiphytic communities among different sites; the influence of caudex height on species richness and compares the species richness among distinct sites.
The bulbous, thickened trunk at left above is called a caudex. The bottle palm (Beaucarnea recurvata) is the most common caudex bearer, or caudiciform.
2004), they differ considerably in stem anatomy, leaf anatomy and inflorescence morphology (Fahn 1954; Waterhouse 1967, 1987; Rudall & Chase 1996), as well as unusual primary root initiation from the stem apex in Kingia, rather than a basal rootstock or caudex (Lamont et al.
Individual plants produce multiple stems from a fibrous caudex. Each stem produces one to several scorpioid inflorescences in which the pendulous flowers open sequentially over the course of the flowering period ([approximately equal to]6 wk in southcentral Alaska).
Solidago sciaphila (hereafter referred to as Solidago) is a glabrous polycarpic perennial that forms a basal rosette from a branched caudex with a fibrous root system (Gleason and Cronquist, 1991).
Both have woody caudex, non-rosulate, fleshy basal leaves, dentate cauline leaves, few- to several-flowered racemes, thick fruiting pedicels, frequently pubescent filament bases, confluent nectar glands, similar number of ovules per ovary, thick fruit valves, relatively large seeds (to 2.5 mm long), and incumbent cotyledons.