cattle plague


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cattle plague

References in periodicals archive ?
the responsibility of the owner to notify the authorities if livestock appear to be suffering from one of a number of specified diseases), together with slaughter, compensation, and movement and import restrictions, which today form the basis of animal epidemic disease control, and the idea of a government department with responsibility for these measures, therefore derive to a remarkable extent from the attitudes and legislation emerging from the successful containment of cattle plague in 1866.
In January 1866, the Archbishop of Canterbury suggested to the Home Secretary that a Day of National Humiliation might arrest the unabated severity of the cattle plague, but the government decided to persist with the Form of Prayer issued to churches in the previous September.
The union has repeatedly stated that the illegal trade in bush meat - including antelope, monkey, rats and bats from Africa - could lead to diseases such as ebola or cattle plague being inadvertently brought into this country.
The PHLS last night moved to assure the public that there was minimal human risk from the cattle plague and said earlier results on six men with similar symptoms had proved negative.
In the 1700s, the biggest threat to livestock was cattle plague or rinderpest, the worst outbreak of which ravaged most of the country in the 1740s and 1750s.
With the chance of a repetition of a demographic disaster looming before them, the government drew upon the legislative precedent and administrative structure created by the cattle plague of 1865-66.