cathode


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cathode

 [kath´ōd]
the electrode at which reduction occurs and to which cations are attracted. adj., adj cathod´ic.

cath·ode (Ca, C),

(kath'ōd),
The negative pole of a galvanic battery or the electrode connected with it; the electrode toward which positively charged ions (cations) migrate and are reduced, and into which electrons are fed from their source (anode or generator). Compare: anode.
Synonym(s): negative electrode
[G. kathodos, a way down, fr. kata, down, + hodos, a way]

cathode

/cath·ode/ (kath´ōd) the electrode at which reduction occurs and to which cations are attracted.cathod´ic

cathode (C)

[kath′ōd]
Etymology: Gk, kata, down, hodos, way
1 the electrode at which reduction occurs.
2 the negative side of the x-ray tube, which consists of the focusing cup and the filament.

cath·ode

(C) (kath'ōd)
1. The negative pole of a galvanic battery or the electrode connected with it; the electrode to which positively charged ions (cations) migrate.
Compare: anode
2. Negatively charged part of the x-ray tube head; it contains the tungsten filament.
Synonym(s): negative electrode.
[G. kathodos, a way down, fr. kata, down, + hodos, a way]

cathode

a negatively charged electrode to which positively charged ions move. Compare ANODE.

Cathode

The negative electrode from which an electromagnetic current flows.

cath·ode

(C) (kath'ōd)
1. The negative pole of a galvanic battery or the electrode connected with it; the electrode to which positively charged ions (cations) migrate.
Compare: anode
2. Negatively charged part of the x-ray tube head; it contains the tungsten filament.
Synonym(s): negative electrode.
[G. kathodos, a way down, fr. kata, down, + hodos, a way]

cathode (kath´ōd),

n a negative electrode from which electrons are emitted and to which positive ions are attracted. In radiographic tubes, the cathode usually consists of a helical tungsten filament, behind which a molybdenum reflector cup is located to focus the electron emission toward the target of the anode.
cathode ray tube (CRT),
n a vacuum tube in which a beam of electrons is focused to a small point on a luminescent screen and can be varied in position to form a pattern.

cathode

1. the negative electrode, from which electrons are emitted and to which positive ions are attracted.
2. the electrode through which current leaves a nerve or other substance.

cathode beam, cathode ray
the beam of electrons, accompanied by high electrical potential which flows from the cathode to the anode in the x-ray tube and interacts with the tungsten target to produce x-rays.
cathode filament
the source of electrons in the cathode tube that interacts with the anode target to produce x-rays.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, when the limiting current conditions are provided, the formation reaction of hydrogen gas is prevented mainly on the cathode surface.
Finally, concentration polarization results as the metal ions are depleted from solution close to the surface of the cathode.
Oxygen was supplied from a cylinder in cathode side and the pressure was maintained at 1 bar.
Figure 1 shows the mean time spent in the cathode half of the trough during training sessions for Gps E and C-NS and during test sessions for the experimental group and both control groups.
signal and the distance from the cathode to the anode electrodes.
Exactly in this zone copper component of the active cathode insert transits into gas phase.
Unique, proprietary features in nanopowder handling enables the production of air cathodes in small test sample sizes up to continuous production capability using the same apparatus, thereby enabling battery manufacturer's R&D facilities to accomplish complex experimental designs related to gas electrode development while enhancing scale-up capability of resulting designs," said QuantumSphere.
In the electricity-generating MFCs, the protons and electrons combine at the cathode with oxygen to form water.
It's the refining of that anode to copper cathode which then goes to market, we're looking at right now.
The Bridgend plant makes the cathode ray tubes, which are used in the colour televisions assembled at Pencoed.
The Whirlwind computer at MIT had a cathode ray tube, a light pen, and an alphanumeric keyboard in the late 1940s.