catheter-related bloodstream infection


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catheter-related bloodstream infection

An infection caused by a bacterium or fungus that enters the blood via a device inserted into it. Staphylococcus aureus, Candida species, Enterococci, and Pseudomonas species are common causes of bacteremia and sepsis in patients with invasive catheters.
References in periodicals archive ?
This affects both the diagnosis and management of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) because obtaining a peripheral culture may not be possible and line removal may not be feasible.
Central venous catheters (CVCs) account for an estimated 90% of all catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI).
Preventing catheter-related bloodstream infection starts with understanding the potential sources of infection.
Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) occur at an average rate of 5 per 1,000 catheter days in intensive-care units in the United States (1), resulting in 80,000 episodes of CR-BSI per year (2).
The Centre for Disease Control definition of catheter-related bloodstream infection is bacteraemia/fungaemia with an intravascular catheter, at least one positive blood culture obtained from a peripheral vein, clinical manifestations of infection and no apparent source for the bloodstream infection except the catheter.
Closed-hub systems with protected connections and the reduction of risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection in pediatric patients receiving intravenous prostanoid therapy for pulmonary hypertension.
RyMed Technologies' Needleless IV Connector Is Associated with Lower Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates
In prospective studies, the relative risk (RR) for a catheter-related bloodstream infection is 2 to 855 times higher with central venous catheters than peripheral venous catheters (1-3).
Jaber (2005) discusses bacterial infections caused by catheters in patients on hemodialysis and identifies the most frequent cause of catheter-related bloodstream infection is from the colonization of the cutaneous catheter tract with skin flora.
Misdiagnosed catheter-related bloodstream infections can result in premature removal of vascular access, which impacts future options for new access creation (Kallen, 2013).