cathectic


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cathectic

 [kah-thek´tik]
pertaining to cathexis.

ca·thec·tic

(kă-thek'tik),
Pertaining to cathexis.

ca·thec·tic

(kă-thek'tik)
Pertaining to cathexis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the case of Diana it seems that the popular press largely failed to recognise this possibility of variable cathectic and semiological orientations.
This melancholic preservation marks the refusal of Caroline to withdraw her cathectic attachment to her missing family members.
Contrary to the 'evaluative' approaches to culture characterized by 'old' institutional models based on Parsonian theory or, by implication, the values-based model of Hofstede, this new institutional theory places greater emphasis upon constitutive cognitive and cathectic psychological influences at the meso and micro level.
Or my to argue that many Americans may even be subliminally attracted to the on going existence of a criminalized class as ready objects for anxious feeling that seek cathectic objects.
Although they have flirted with the cathectic (affective) and conative (motivational) modes of consciousness, in the context of identity salience or prominence (Stryker 1968, 1980; McCall and Simmons 1978), identity theorists have generally viewed identities in cognitive terms (see MacKinnon 1994).
Such a film might eventually prompt whole new ways of recollection that are essentially free from language--indeed might prompt whole new definitions of what "language" might eventually come to be...an un-nouned, non-dichotomous series of light-glyphs available for arrangements of cathectic exchanges which directly reflect each person's synapsing inner nervous system.
When, in turn, this anger proves incapable of restoring the subject to the earlier, wished-for state of things, the characteristic symptoms of clinical depression set in: feelings of helplessness, a tendency to reproach the self for its inadequacy, and, not least of all, the drawing away of cathectic energies from the ego, "emptying [it] until it is totally impoverished."(18) This impoverishment is also referred to by Freud and others as inhibition: "inhibition of all activity," "general inhibition," "complete motor inhibition," or "an inhibition of functions including the interest in the external world."(19) And Bibring has instructively spoken of it as the "exhaustion of ego libido due to an unsolvable conflict" (p.