cathect


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cathect

(kə-thĕkt′, kă-)
tr.v. ca·thected, ca·thecting, ca·thects
To invest emotional energy in (a person, object, or idea).

ca·thec′tic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense--adequacy figured as stasis itself, and thus toxic to thought--maybe we can understand why it might be reasonable for Ward to later remind himself that "things don't cathect," which I read as a kind of precautionary ballast; he is always teetering toward this conclusion, especially in his next book, The Crisis of Infinite Worlds.
During the promotive interaction, actions by groupmates that increase the likelihood of the student succeeding are positively cathected to, and this positive cathexis is generalized to the groupmates.
And he suggested that the ego state that is most highly cathected at any given time holds the executive power and is felt as the self.
In complex addiction, people not only derive taste pleasure from sugar but cathect to it as well, finding in a candy bar or bowl of ice cream a deep psychological comfort, a sense of security or self-reward that developed in childhood.
Later, he was able to jettison the woman, to cathect, as it were, by eroticization, the landscape by depicting it from the perspective of a body moving through it.
We subjects of capitalist societies have to talk about the ways in which we are constructed to eroticize and cathect pain, as well as the way pain is transformed into pleasure, and self-destruction into self-creation.
Barthes refers to his experience in Morocco to explain that political issues in postcolonial Arab countries actually cathect language and to suggest that linguistics needs some equivalent of Marxism's Capital to theorize the appropriation and ownership of the resource of language.
Their love of markets is especially paradoxical as agency is exercised mostly through consumerism, but they cathect their anger to the big corporations who frustrate their individual freedom by diminishing their purchasing power.
Getting the basket, scoring the point, winning the game: We as spectators cathect so much to repeated performances of this particular net swoosh, yet Pfeiffer's film deflates it to a simple, breezelike movement of some woven nylon cords.
I have suggested that one attraction of the credulous reader to Booth may be that the narrative audience can be used to cordon off the area of readerly experience in which we cathect with the fiction most forcefully and find ourselves most dramatically at its mercy.
Ivan Costello's presence in the dream is a clear instance of the "day's residue," an arbitrary sign with which unconscious wishes cathect in order to find some form of expression.