cathartic

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cathartic

 [kah-thahr´tik]
1. causing emptying of the bowels.
2. an agent that so acts; called also evacuant and purgative.
3. producing emotional catharsis.
bulk cathartic one stimulating bowel evacuation by increasing fecal volume.
lubricant cathartic one that acts by softening the feces and reducing friction between them and the intestinal wall.
saline cathartic one that increases fluidity of intestinal contents by retention of water by osmotic forces, and indirectly increases motor activity.
stimulant cathartic one that directly increases motor activity of the intestinal tract.

ca·thar·tic

(kă-thar'tik),
1. Relating to catharsis.
2. An agent having purgative action.

cathartic

/ca·thar·tic/ (-tik)
1. causing emptying of the bowels.
2. an agent that empties the bowels.
3. producing emotional catharsis.

bulk cathartic  one stimulating bowel evacuation by increasing fecal volume.
lubricant cathartic  one that acts by softening the feces and reducing friction between them and the intestinal wall.
saline cathartic  one that increases fluidity of intestinal contents by retention of water by osmotic forces and indirectly increases motor activity.
stimulant cathartic  one that directly increases motor activity of the intestinal tract.

cathartic

(kə-thär′tĭk)
adj.
Inducing catharsis; purgative.
n.
An agent for purging the bowels, especially a laxative.

cathartic

[kəthär′tik]
Etymology: Gk, katharsis, cleansing
1 adj, pertaining to a substance that causes evacuation of the bowel.
2 n, an agent that promotes bowel evacuation by stimulating peristalsis, increasing the fluidity or bulk of intestinal contents, softening the feces, or lubricating the intestinal wall. The term cathartic implies a fluid evacuation, in contrast to laxative, which implies the elimination of a soft, formed stool. Cathartics that increase peristalsis, usually by irritating intestinal mucosa, include certain plant substances, such as aloe, colocynth, croton oil, podophyllum senna, phenolphthalein, bisacodyl, and dehydrocholic acid. Saline cathartics, such as sodium sulfate, magnesium sulfate, and magnesium hydroxide, dilute the intestinal contents by retaining water through osmotic forces. Suppositories containing sodium biphosphate, sodium acid pyrophosphate, and sodium bicarbonate induce defecation when the salts react to form carbon dioxide and the expanding gas stimulates peristalsis. Also called coprogogue [kop′rəgōg] . catharsis, n.

cathartic

Herbal medicine
adjective Referring to an evacuative therapeutic agent.
 
noun A herb that evokes intestinal evacuation.

Herbal cathartics
• Black root—Leptandra virginica.
• Butternut—Juglans cinerea.
• Castor oil plant—Ricinus communis.
• Jalapa—Ipomoea jalapa.
• Mayapple—Podophyllum peltatum.
• Mountain flax—Linum catharticum.
• Rhubarb—Rheum palmatum.
• Senna—Cassia acutifolia. 
 
Medspeak
adjective Having the effect of or referring to a laxative.
 
noun A laxative.

Psychiatry
adjective Referring to or having the effect of catharsis.

cathartic

adjective Referring to
1. Catharsis, see there.
2. An evacuative therapeutic agent Mainstream medicine noun A purgative, laxative.

ca·thar·tic

(kă-thahr'tik)
1. Relating to catharsis.
2. An agent having purgative action (i.e., of the bowel).

cathartic,

n a substance that expels material from or cleanses the gastrointestinal tract.

cathartic

1. causing bowel evacuation, usually of liquid feces; an agent that so acts.
2. producing catharsis.

bulk cathartic
one stimulating bowel evacuation by increasing fecal volume.
irritant cathartic
contact irritants that directly or indirectly cause diarrhea. May cause superpurgation in susceptible animals, especially horses. Drastic purgatives such as croton oil are no longer used. Castor oil, danthron, senna and cascara are still used, but much less than more bland agents such as mineral oil.
lubricant cathartic
one that acts by softening the feces and reducing friction between them and the intestinal wall.
osmotic cathartic
agents which retain water into the intestinal lumen, thereby producing liquid feces; includes saline cathartics (below).
saline cathartic
one that increases fluidity of intestinal contents by retention of water by osmotic forces, and indirectly increases motor activity.
stimulant cathartic
one that directly increases motor activity of the intestinal tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
All that was missing was Rocky's chance for rejuvenation, allowing the audience to cathartically be resurrected as well.
Indeed, reading Babes in Boyland can be cathartically painful, as we experience the constant alienation and longing for inclusion along with our terribly funny narrator.
The point is that finding yourself up to your soul in a Greek tragedy would constitute being cathartically let off the hook, morally speaking.
The novel humorously implies that their mutual passion cathartically rids Hannibal of his need to kill.
Miss Middlebrook escorts us over the well-ploughed-up battleground of the Hughes-Plath uni-lethal mesalliance, but then, descending to the furrows, proceeds to analyse the soil, and dig cathartically below the surface.
I wept hugely but cathartically as I felt the contrast between the images of flames and death and destruction and hatred, and this simple, jolly little stream, constant in its replenishment.
The story works to its climax when the child nearly exposes her mother's secret (as her bad angels want her to) but holds her tongue (as her good angels win out) and, cathartically, drops a platter of food on the way to the family table.
And even Paul Cadmus, who seems never to have agonized over his sexual orientation, nonetheless "paints out" (in the sense that an author might cathartically "write out") aspects of the community of which he forms a part, but about which he feels misgivings.
Both the expressions of fear of failure and those of enjoyment were not utilised within this discourse community as simple, reflective comments made cathartically (although that function is probably quite important).
At the very moment a nation has an opportunity to cathartically purge its past and identify and hold accountable those few individuals responsible for its sins, it refuses to distance itself from the actors and their atrocious acts and thus must take collective responsibility for them.
Brown's Gothic text therefore derives its unsettling effects from the function of Clithero's narrative as a talking-cure-gone-wrong: instead of cathartically abreacting a prior trauma, Clithero's hysterical discourse serves to reiteratively confirm his compulsive and disturbed "reasoning" as "necessary" and "rational.
In a nutshell: Anyone who's ever had a job should find this cathartically hilarious.