catharsis


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catharsis

 [kah-thahr´sis]
1. a cleansing of the bowels; called also evacuation and purgation.
2. the bringing into consciousness and the emotional reliving of a forgotten (repressed) painful experience as a means of releasing anxiety and tension.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ca·thar·sis

(kă-thar'sis),
1. Synonym(s): purgation
2. The release or discharge of emotional tension or anxiety by psychoanalytically guided emotional reliving of past, especially repressed, events. Synonym(s): psychocatharsis
[G. katharsis, purification, fr. katharos, pure]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

catharsis

(kə-thär′sĭs)
n. pl. cathar·ses (-sēz)
1. Medicine Purgation, especially for the digestive system.
2. Psychology
a. A technique used to relieve tension and anxiety by bringing repressed feelings and fears to consciousness.
b. The therapeutic result of this process; abreaction.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

catharsis

Cathartic method Psychiatry Any psychoanalytic technique in which the client is led to recognize the underlying basis for underlying mental issues, and release associated suppressed or forgotten emotions by talking them out; catharsis is integral to primal therapy and Reichian therapy. See Primal therapy, Psychoanalysis, Reichian therapy, Repression.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ca·thar·sis

(kă-thahr'sis)
1. Synonym(s): purgation.
2. The release or discharge of emotional tension or anxiety by psychoanalytically guided emotional reliving of past, especially repressed, events.
[G. katharsis, purification, fr. katharos, pure]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

catharsis

1. Purging of the bowels.
2. A psychoanalytic term meaning the release of anxiety and tension experienced when repressed matter, which has been ‘poisoning’ the mind, is brought into consciousness.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Catharsis

Therapeutic discharge of emotional tension by recalling past events.
Mentioned in: Art Therapy
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Freud, who used hypnosis with the aim of curing suppressed memories of traumatic events, saw the catharsis technique as an interesting concept to be used in psychotherapy, he moved towards other techniques, as his trials with catharsis were unsuccessful (Breuer & Freud, 1974).
This chapter and Schneider's thesis as a whole owe a great deal to an important yet little known article by Pier Cesare Rivoltella (13, n 2) on the heated, ongoing debates of the cinquecento surrounding the notoriously slippery term 'catharsis'.
The Catharsis program sees 20 women attend workshops three times per week.
The word 'catharsis' means a feeling of emotional 'letting go' linked to the need for resolving unconscious and psychological conflicts.
Explores the application of hypnosis to eating disorders, reviewing the research published over the last decade, and discusses the increasing awareness of the value of hypnosis as an adjunct to therapy, especially in the treatment of bulimia, such as the importance of the ego-dissociation mechanism and the roles of age regression, abreactions, and catharsis. Personal therapy findings are reviewed that used a variety of hypnotic techniques with a number of eating-disorder patients treated individually in private practice.
My boss said: "Think of it as a fresh start.'' Another colleague suggested it was an act of catharsis, like cleaning out a cupboard and throwing away unworn clothes.
Fendt makes the bones of the reconstruction sound simple and obvious: whereas tragedy, for Aristotle, aimed at the catharsis of pity and fear, comedy should aim at the catharsis of desire and sympathy.
End Times recounts every chapter of the story--happy moments ("The Beginning"), conflict ("A Line in the Dirt"), angry separation ("Unhinged"), and acceptance ("On My Feet")--transforming bitterness into catharsis through mordant wit that takes the edge off all that misery.
Anyway, as a form of catharsis for this traumatic incident, I've since jeered and laughed hysterically at Higgins every time he does something remotely embarrassing on television.
If no catharsis can be possible under Speaker Michael Martin - something a clear majority in the House now believes - then neither can this morally bankrupted Parliament, stinking in the ordure, command the confidence of the people to clear out the Augean Stables.
Any who would keep a journal or use writing as a catharsis for personal evolution will find this a fine survey making it a key pick for general-interest collections as well as high school to college-level libraries.
"Jessica: Autobiography of an Infant" is a look at the case of Jessica who through extensive use of the technique known as catharsis is brought back to reflect in full English the thoughts that went through her head as a toddler, when most of us just remember a blur.