catecholamines


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cat·e·chol·a·mines

(kat'ĕ-kol'ă-mēnz),
Pyrocatechols with an alkylamine side chain; examples of biochemical interest are epinephrine, norepinephrine, and l-dopa. Catecholamines are major elements in responses to stress.

cat·e·chol·a·mines

(kat'ĕ-kol'ă-mēnz)
Pyrocatechols with an alkylamine side chain; examples of biochemical interest are epinephrine, norepinephrine, and l-dopa. Catecholamines are major elements in responses to stress.

catecholamines

The group of AMINES, which includes adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine and chemically related amines. These are derived from the amino acid tyrosine, and act as neurotransmitters or hormones.

Catecholamines

Family of neurotransmitters containing dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine, produced and secreted by cells of the adrenal medulla in the brain. Catecholamines have excitatory effects on smooth muscle cells of the vessels that supply blood to the skin and mucous membranes and have inhibitory effects on smooth muscle cells located in the wall of the gut, the bronchial tree of the lungs, and the vessels that supply blood to skeletal muscle. There are two different main types of receptors for these neurotransmitters, called alpha and beta adrenergic receptors. The catecholamines are therefore are also known as adrenergic neurotransmitters.
References in periodicals archive ?
GIAPREZA was approved by the European Commission (EC) in August 2019 for the treatment of refractory hypotension in adults with septic or other distributive shock who remain hypotensive despite adequate volume restitution and application of catecholamines and other available vasopressor therapies.
Investigating the relationship between air pollution exposures and catecholamines can therefore shed light on the mechanisms linking air pollution to chronic diseases affected by sympathetic functions, including respiratory and cardiovascular outcomes.
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of music on pre-operative anxiety and physiological parameters including HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and serum catecholamine levels.
In contrast, in long-term treatment, TCAs induce adrenergic desensitization, and moreover, catecholamine depletion may further deteriorate response to sympathomimetics.[5] The less potent sympathomimetics may not be effective for the hypotension in long-term TCA treatment patients because the adrenergic receptors are desensitized and catecholamine storage is depleted.[15] The depletion of norepinephrine stores resulting from TCAs causes a peripheral adrenergic receptor blockade and they block the reuptake of norepinephrine and dopamine at presynaptic nerve terminals.[16] This predisposes chronic TCA users to lower blood pressures during induction of anesthesia.
Effects of diazepam premedication and epinephrine-containing local anesthetic on cardiovascular and plasma catecholamine responses to oral surgery.
MRI allows for visualization of vessel invasion and may be performed using contrast without risk of catecholamine release.
Most of PG are located in the head and the neck while deriving from the parasympathetic nervous system and rarely produce catecholamines. On the contrary, most of the PG deriving from the sympathic system are located in the abdomen, produce catecholamines, and are unique, sporadic, benign, and more common in middle-aged women [2].
Pheochromocytoma crisis (PC) is a potentially life threatening event caused by high levels of catecholamines secreted by the neoplastic chromaffin cells leading to organ failure [11, 12].
These contraction bands likely reflect the acute effects of high levels of catecholamines on the myocardium and can develop after 5 to 10 minutes of high dose catecholamine infusions in experimental animals [38].
Midgut NETs are able to excrete catecholamines [32].
24-hour urine dopamine was drawn due to minimal elevation of metanephrines and normal catecholamines. Dopamine levels were severely elevated, >25x normal range at 6988 [micro]g/day (0-250).
Cardiac rhythm disturbances and the release of catecholamines after acute coronary occlusion in dogs.