catecholamine


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Related to catecholamine: serotonin

catecholamine

 [kat″ĕ-kol´ah-mēn″]
any of a group of sympathomimetic amines (including dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine), the aromatic portion of whose molecule is catechol.

The catecholamines play an important role in the body's physiological response to stress. Their release at sympathetic nerve endings increases the rate and force of muscular contraction of the heart, thereby increasing cardiac output; constricts peripheral blood vessels, resulting in elevated blood pressure; elevates blood glucose levels by hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogenolysis; and promotes an increase in blood lipids by increasing the catabolism of fats.

catecholamine

/cat·e·chol·amine/ (kat″ah-kol´ah-mēn″) any of a group of sympathomimetic amines (including dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine), the aromatic portion of whose molecule is catechol.

catecholamine

(kăt′ĭ-kō′lə-mēn′, -kô′-)
n.
Any of a group of monoamines, including epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine, that act as neurotransmitters and hormones.

catecholamine

[kat′əkəlam′in]
any one of a group of sympathomimetic compounds composed of a catechol (1,2-dihydroxyphenyl) moiety carrying an alkyl side chain with an amine group on the side chain. Some catecholamines are produced naturally by the body and function as key neurological chemicals.

catecholamine

Endocrinology A biogenic amine from tyramine/phenylalanine which contains a catechol nucleus Examples Epinephrine–adrenaline in UK, norepinephrine–noradrenaline and dopamine, which act as hormones and neurotransmitter in the peripheral and central nervous system; catecholamines are produced by sympathetic nervous system activation Activity Autonomic arousal, fight-or-flight stress response, reward response. See Biogenic amine, Dopamine, Epinephrine, Indolamine, Norepinephrine.

catecholamine

any CATECHOL-derived compound such as adrenalin or dopamine, which exert a neurotransmitting action similar to that of the sympathetic nervous system (see AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM).

catecholamine (kat´əkō´ləmēn´),

n any one of a group of sympathomimetic compounds composed of a catechol molecule and the aliphatic portion of amine. Some catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine) are produced naturally by the body and function as key neurologic chemicals.

catecholamine

any of a group of sympathomimetic amines (including dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine), the aromatic portion of whose molecule is catechol.
The catecholamines play an important role in the body's physiological response to stress. Their release at sympathetic nerve endings increases the rate and force of muscular contraction of the heart, thereby increasing cardiac output; constricts peripheral blood vessels, resulting in elevated blood pressure; elevates blood glucose levels by hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogenolysis; and promotes an increase in blood lipids by increasing the catabolism of fats.

catecholamine-depleting agents
cause depletion of neuronal stores of norepinephrine, thereby reducing adrenergic responses, e.g. reserpine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The adrenal medulla is the most sensitive source of neurotransmitters; catecholamines are rapidly metabolized because of their extremely reduced half-life, helping an effective mobilization of all the available internal resources to counteract stress.
Conclusions: This study provides evidence that curcumin acts on adipocytes to suppress the lipolysis response to TNFet and catecholamines.
They work by blocking the action of catecholamine, norepinephrine and dopamine transporters which help to retain the stay time in the cortex.
Further investigations included 24-hour urinary catecholamines, which were negative on two occasions.
Functional secretory tumors make up 77% of sPGL of the Organ of Zuckerkandl, producing the aforementioned symptoms of catecholamine excess.
15) The many reasons for non-diagnosis include the nonspecific nature of the symptoms, the clinicians' low index of suspicion, and that some tumours are asymptomatic because they are non-functioning or secrete relatively small amounts of catecholamines.
The researchers had hypothesized that suppression of the catecholamine surge in multiply injured TBI patients with beta-adrenergic blockade decreases mortality.
Urine cortisol and catecholamine (adrenaline and noradrenaline) concentrations were analyzed using immunoassay kits (Oxford Biomedical Research, Inc.
The laboratory investigations revealed an elevated 24hour urine free cortisol level and normal catecholamine levels (Tables 1 and 2).
Catecholamine release from the sympathetic nervous system is an important modulator of immune regulation.
In contrast, when urine or plasma epinephrine levels represent more than 20% of the total catecholamine level, it is likely that the pheochromocytoma is of adrenal origin (2).