catch-up vaccination


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

catch-up vaccination

The immunization of unvaccinated children at the most convenient times (e.g., on the first day of school) rather than at the optimal time for antibody production. Because many children miss vaccines at regularly scheduled times, catch-up immunization offers unvaccinated children, their families, and the communities in which they live a second opportunity for disease prevention and control.
Synonym: catch-up immunization
See also: vaccination
References in periodicals archive ?
The impact of human papillomavirus catch-up vaccination in Australia: implications for introduction of multiple age cohort vaccination and postvaccination data interpretation.
Catch-up vaccination will expand coverage to adolescents who might have missed it, and data show that the vaccine effectiveness is high, and the rates of adverse events are low in the child and adolescent population, said Noele Nelson, MD, of the CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, who presented the recommendations to the committee.
In 2007, an expert advisory body, including members from the Ministry of Health and National Center for Infectious and Parasitic Disease Control, issued official recommendations for the use of HPV vaccines in Bulgaria for girls 12 to 18 years old before first sexual con-tact, with catch-up vaccinations up to age 26.
"This will allow for continued use of varicella vaccine for all age groups, including the routine two-dose schedule for children aged 12-15 months and 4-6 years, catch-up vaccination with the second dose for children or adolescents who received only 1 dose, and vaccination with two doses for other children, adolescents, and adults without evidence of immunity," the notice said.
When adequate levels are reached, children who missed [greater than or equal to]1 dose of vaccine should be recalled and vaccinated, and catch-up vaccination levels should be monitored.
The work group could not reach consensus on a catch-up vaccination campaign for adolescents, as was conducted in England recently in response to outbreaks there.
Recommendations have included universal hepatitis B vaccination of API infants beginning in 1990 and catch-up vaccination for API children aged [less than]7 years [5].
In a second analysis, catch-up vaccination of children from 2 to 4.9 years old was found to be more cost effective than infant vaccination--especially for children in day care, who are at high risk for pneumococcal infection.
Following the implementation of measles catch-up vaccination campaigns in the remaining five countries, the number of reported measles cases decreased by 93% (Figure 1); 56,123 cases were reported by the five countries in 1996, compared with 3672 cases in 1998.