catastrophism


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catastrophism

the thesis that fossil beds represented catastrophic MASS EXTINCTIONS so that the fossil record showed a series of separate creations, each followed by a mass mortality. Held largely in the 18th and 19th centuries, this idea lost support with the development of evolutionary theory in the 20th century.
References in periodicals archive ?
Winlow, Simon 2016 "Enlightened Catastrophism."Teesside Center for Realist Criminology, December 13.
"Catastrophism, Uniformitarianism, and a Scientific Realism Debate That Makes a Difference," Philosophy of Science 82(5): 867-878.
Moreover, modification of diurnal cortisol level associated with childhood maltreatment has been described in fibromyalgia and could contribute to great emotional distress and high catastrophism observed in these patients [29, 30].
In this respect, she takes issue with the catastrophism and (post)apocalyptism of many recent novels and blockbusters of the sci-fi and cli-fi genre that are precisely trapped in such exclusive disjunctions that foreclose the theorisation and imagination of a future-to-come that is open to human and nonhuman lives alike.
In these heady days, the discourse on environmental values often seems caught between catastrophism on the one hand, and an exuberant embrace of the Anthropocene's brave new world on the other (Baskin, 2015; Spash, 2015).
Franz Boas's school of cultural diffusionism and relationality), psychology (Ken Wilber's school of the potentially infinite-dimensionality of the psyche and reality's spirit of multi-stratified, multi-levelled multiple holonic evolution), psychiatry, cultural anthropology and earth sciences (Immanuel Velikovsky's school of catastrophism), semantics (Alfred Korzybski's school of space binding and time binding), etc., showing that the evolution of living forms is not necessarily always ascensive.
Arguing against such catastrophism, she reminds us that the US still has a higher marriage rate than any other industrialized country.
In addition, the book contains two chapters on developments in science from 1950 to 1990 that led to the acceptance of catastrophism (the acceptance that the earth has undergone huge upheavals in the past).
More specifically, Wearden and Emsley (2013) observed the long-term importance of beliefs about the meaning of the symptoms (catastrophism), even to a greater extent than increased activity or improved cardiovascular and muscular deconditioning.
Jefferies' novel stands as particularly enlightening since his narrator attempts to account for the ecological disaster that has befallen London and offers both theories of gradualism and catastrophism.
As a result, "the pathos of Marlowe's virtual catastrophism had suddenly come to look too reall" (8) Constance Brown Kuriyama surveyed recent biographical studies and calls for "more information and less freewheeling speculation in Marlowe biography." (9) Christopher Matusiak reexamined Marlowe's popularity, his affiliation with Philip Henslowe and Edward Alleyn, and the implications of the Rose playhouse excavations (in 1989) for our understanding of the playing conditions in his time.
(19) Sasha Lilley, David McNally, Eddie Yuen and James Davis, Catastrophism: The Apocalyptic Politics of Collapse and Rebirth (Oakland, CA: PM Press, 2012), 126.