catarrh


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catarrh

 [kah-tahr´]
inflammation of a mucous membrane (particularly of the head and throat), with free discharge of mucus. adj., adj catar´rhal.

ca·tar·rhal in·flam·ma·tion

term for inflammatory process that is most frequently seen in the respiratory tract, but may occur in any mucous membrane, and is characterized by hyperemia of the mucosal vessels, edema of the interstitial tissue, enlargement of the secretory epithelial cells (which proliferate and form conspicuous globules of mucus), and an irregular layer of viscous, mucinous material on the surface; as exudation progresses, variable numbers of neutrophils migrate into the affected tissue and are included in the exudate, along with fragments of degenerated and necrotic epithelial cells; such an inflammation may frequently become mucopurulent.

catarrh

(kə-tär′)
n.
Copious discharge of mucus associated with inflammation of mucous membranes, especially of the nose and throat.

ca·tarrh′al, ca·tarrh′ous adj.
ca·tarrh′al·ly adv.

catarrh

A nonspecific term of waning use for inflammation of the mucosae, in particular the oronasopharyngeal mucosa.

catarrh

Infectious disease Inflammation of the nasopharyngeal mucosa with fluid discharge

ca·tarrh

(kă-tahr')
Inflammation of a mucous membrane with increased flow of mucus or exudate.
[G. katarrheō, to flow down]

catarrh

Inflammation of mucous membrane lining of an organ, especially the nose and throat. Catarrhal inflammation results in excess mucus secretion.

ca·tar·rhal in·flam·ma·tion

(kă-tahr'ăl in'flă-mā'shŭn)
Term for inflammatory process that is most frequently seen in the respiratory tract, but may occur in any mucous membrane; characterized by hyperemia of the mucosal vessels, edema of the interstitial tissue, enlargement of the secretory epithelial cells (which proliferate and form conspicuous globules of mucus), and an irregular layer of viscous, mucinous material on the surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
West Kirby Children's Convalescent Home, which continues today as a residential school, and right, an 1899 illustration of a toddler with chronic catarrh using an inhalation machine
Vernal catarrh (n=51; 1.6%) was the second most common ocular abnormality, followed by squint (n=16; 0.5%).
Lee's elixir: a sovereign remedy for colds, obstinate coughs, catarrhs, asthma, and approaching consumptions .
throat-clearing of pipes with catarrh. In the lodge
In 43 patients who showed atypical GERD symptoms (abdominal discomfort, belch, catarrh, dysphagia, choking, globus, hoarseness, cough, wheeze, or acid taste), a positive SI occurred with nonacid reflux in 23% and with acid reflux in 2% of the patients.
Helpful for colds, as it dislodges phlegm and catarrh
A clinical examination, including a nasal inspection, revealed a minimal amount of catarrh, but no other evidence of a foreign body.
Among the most notorious carriers were soft drinks, coca wines such as Vin Mariani, and catarrh cures.
It also helps soothe coughs, catarrh, bronchitis, headaches, nerves and insomnia.
While catarrh remained virulent it overshadowed the other disease but both declined in incidence after 1845 to the point where there were only sporadic outbreaks in various regions of the colony, despite endemic infestation south of the Murray.(50) One possible factor in the decline was the popularity of boiling-down stock for tallow after 1843.
I had some fluid extracted from my stomach catarrh.
Early herbalists used the leaves in infusions to treat catarrh, pleurisy and smallpox.