cataplexy

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cataplexy

 [kat´ah-plek″se]
a condition, often associated with narcolepsy; marked by abrupt attacks of muscular weakness and hypotonia triggered by an emotional stimulus, such as mirth, anger, or fear. adj., adj cataplec´tic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cat·a·plex·y

(kat'ă-plek'sē),
A transient attack of extreme generalized weakness, often precipitated by an emotional response, such as surprise, fear, or anger; one component of the narcolepsy quadrad.
[cata- + G. plēxis, a blow, stroke]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cataplexy

(kăt′ə-plĕk′sē)
n. pl. cataplex·ies
A sudden loss of muscle tone and strength, usually caused by an extreme emotional stimulus.

cat′a·plec′tic (-plĕk′tĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A rare—1:2,000—condition characterised by recurrent episodes of abrupt decrease/loss of muscle tone either limited to muscle groups, or generalized, leading to muscle weakness, paralysis or postural collapse; cataplexy in an awake person is pathognomonic of narcolepsy, and is triggered by emotional stimuli or stress, which may cause knee-buckling; cataplectic attacks are dangerous for machinists, house painters, construction workers
Precipitating factors Outburst of emotion, strenuous physical exercise, flashes of light. It may present as a side effect of SSRI discontinuation syndrome
Diagnosis Flat EMG potentials, loss of tendon reflexes during an attack, eye movements similar to those of REM sleep, REM sleep pattern immediately on falling asleep
Management Imipramine, protripyline, IMAOs
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cataplexy

Neurology An abrupt ↓/loss of muscle tone either limited to muscle groups, or generalized, leading to muscle weakness, paralysis or postural collapse; cataplexy in an awake person is pathognomonic of narcolepsy, and is triggered by emotional stimuli or stress, which may cause knee-buckling; cataplectic attacks are dangerous for machinists, house painters, construction workers Management Imipramine, protripyline, IMAOs. See Narcolepsy.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cat·a·plex·y

(kat'ă-plek-sē)
A transient attack of extreme generalized muscular weakness, often precipitated by an emotional state such as laughing, surprise, fear, or anger.
[cata- + G. plēxis, a blow, stroke]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cataplexy

The momentary paralysis, or weakness of the limbs, that sometimes affects people surprised by a strong emotion such as, anger, fear, jealousy, happiness or hilarity.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

cataplexy

a human nervous condition in which individuals suddenly collapse to the ground without loss of consciousness. It can be induced by strong emotion.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Cataplexy

A symptom of narcolepsy in which there is a sudden episode of muscle weakness triggered by emotions. The muscle weakness may cause the person's knees to buckle, or the head to drop. In severe cases, the patient may become paralyzed for a few seconds to minutes.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.