cataplectic


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Related to cataplectic: cataleptic

cat·a·plec·tic

(kat'ă-plek'tik),
1. Developing suddenly.
2. Pertaining to cataplexy.

cat·a·plec·tic

(kat'ă-plek'tik)
1. Developing suddenly.
2. Pertaining to cataplexy.

cataplectic

(kăt-ă-plĕk′tĭk) [″ + plexis, stroke]
Pert. to cataplexy.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He also described being able to better handle cataplectic attacks, and generalized episodes lessened progressively from at least five per day at baseline to two or less than two per day after the first IVIg cycle and to two or three per week after the second IVIg cycle.
No cataplectic episode was observed in patient number 3 following introduction of sodium oxybate, and EDS persists ameliorated.
One scan was performed during a cataplectic attack and the second scan during an asymptomatic period, in which she had been attack-free for eight hours.
Cataplectic attacks may affect as many as 25,000 of the estimated 135,000 U.S.
However, when this analysis was repeated with only the cataplectic respondents, no statistically significant association was found (except with hypnagogic hallucinations).
The doctor added: "If Philip had a cataplectic attack in these circumstances he would lose control of his arms and, in particular, he would lose control of his legs and wouldn't be able to brake."
"Any form of activity becomes virtually impossible because of the excitement." Father -of-two David had his first cataplectic attack 12 years ago, when it was thought his frequent naps were down to a hectic work schedule.
Some of the episodes might also be cataplectic events, notes Yanagisawa.
The doctor added: "If Philip had a cataplectic attack in these circumstances, he would lose control of his arms and, in particular, he would lose control of his legs and wouldn't be able to brake."
Simply playing fetch can trigger a cataplectic attack.