cataphora


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Related to cataphora: Exophora

cataphora

A term that has been retired from the working medical parlance, defined as a clouded or semicomatose mental state punctuated by periods of partial consciousness.

ca·taph·o·ra

(kă-taf'ŏr-ă)
Semicoma or somnolence interrupted by intervals of partial consciousness.
[G. a falling down]
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It has been observed that both in English and Urdu texts, Exophoric, Anaphoric, Cataphora references exist, but Anaphoric and Cataphora references in Urdu appear to be complex for the dual role of pronouns.
On a more commercial plane, the Cataphora software goes beyond the textual in documents to layers where relationships take on significance.
Now she, and Cataphora, are applying those same analytics to a different market: people who want to analyze their own e-mail correspondence (and eventually other content) to see a reflection of their interactions with others.
Cataphora (cataphora.com) C-Evidence--provides everything needed to analyze, cull, prioritize, review and produce documents quickly and cost-effectively.
In other words, text appropriate for content analysis is composed of linguistic elements arranged in a linear sequence that follows rules of grammar and dependencies and uses devices such as recurrence, anaphora and cataphora, ellipsis, and conjunctions to cause the elements to "hang together" to create a message (cohesion).
Suspense and the influence of cataphora on viewers' expectations.
A su vez, la referencia endoforica puede ser anaforica (anaphora), si el elemento que presupone depende de un elemento anterior en el contexto linguistico o co-texto; o cataforica (cataphora), si el elemento que presupone precede al elemento presupuesto (20) (1976: 33).
In other words, the majority of instances of structural cataphora -- "the simple realization of a grammatical relationship within the nominal group" -- will be non-cohesive, even in high level interlanguage texts (Halliday & Hasan, 1976, p.
Knud Sorensen, in the course of a diachronic study of cataphoric pronouns in English, concludes that `pronominal cataphora is very rare in Old and Middle English.'(6) He finds a single example of pronominal cataphora in Old English, a sentence in a homily by AElfric, which he tentatively attributes to slavish rendering of a Latin original.
Thus, the book is somewhat uneven since we have technical details on parataxis, hypotaxis, and cataphora, on the one hand, and are subjected to basic information elsewhere; e.g., Classical Arabic has three parts of speech, the ism 'noun', fi l 'verb', and harf 'particle' (p.