catalepsy


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Related to catalepsy: narcolepsy

catalepsy

 [kat´ah-lep″se]
a condition of diminished responsiveness usually characterized by a trancelike state and constantly maintained immobility, often with cerea flexibilitas. Affected individuals may remain in one position for minutes, days, or even longer. adj., adj catalep´tic.

Catalepsy may accompany any of several different mental illnesses. It is common in catatonic schizophrenia and may also occur in epilepsy, hysteria, and cerebellar disorders; it may also be induced by hypnosis. The patient may sit with the hands flat on the knees and the head bowed or may remain in an awkward and uncomfortable position. The patient is not necessarily unaware of what is going on but does not respond. This apathetic condition may end as suddenly as it begins.
Patient Care. Regular skin care and exercise of the muscles and joints are necessary to prevent circulatory complications. Nutritional status requires attention and an adequate diet must be provided. Even though cataleptic patients may not be able to respond to spoken directions or conversation and are physically unable to move, they cannot be left in one position for long periods of time any more than can patients who are physically paralyzed. The mental state of these patients is such that they cannot recognize numbness or pain, nor can they communicate a need for attention.

Care must be used in conversations held within the patient's hearing. Total apathy does not indicate a loss of ability to hear or see what is going on. Sometimes it is of great help to these patients to have someone sit quietly beside them so that they are aware that someone cares and is genuinely interested in their welfare.

A sudden change in the patient's condition, with increased activity, may indicate progression from one state of extreme emotion to another. Restlessness or talkativeness usually do not indicate a dramatic improvement in mental condition. When the patient becomes more active the staff should be alert to the possibility of suicide and attempts at self-mutilation. A person who has exhibited symptoms as severe as catalepsy is very ill and will need continued and long-term care to facilitate recovery from serious emotional problems.

cat·a·lep·sy

(kat'ă-lep'sē),
A condition characterized by waxy rigidity of the limbs, which may be placed in various positions that are maintained for a time, lack of response to stimuli, mutism, and inactivity; occurs with some psychoses, especially catatonic schizophrenia.
[G. katalēpsis, a seizing, catalepsy, fr. kata, down, + lēpsis, a seizure]

catalepsy

(kăt′l-ĕp′sē)
n. pl. catalep·sies
A condition characterized by lack of response to external stimuli and by muscular rigidity, so that the limbs remain where they are positioned. It occurs in a variety of physical and psychological disorders, such as epilepsy and schizophrenia, and can be induced by hypnosis.

cat′a·lep′tic (kăt′l-ĕp′tĭk) adj.
cat′a·lep′ti·cal·ly adv.
The rigid maintenance of a body position over an extended period of time; a state of decreased responsiveness accompanied by a trancelike state, as seen in organic or psychologic disorders or under hypnosis

catalepsy

Psychiatry A state of ↓ responsiveness with a trancelike states, which occurs in organic or psychologic disorders, or under hypnosis

cat·a·lep·sy

(kat'ă-lep-sē)
A morbid condition characterized by waxy rigidity of the limbs, lack of response to stimuli, mutism, and inactivity; occurs with some psychoses, especially catatonic schizophrenia.
[G. katalēpsis, a seizing, catalepsy, fr. kata, down, + lēpsis, a seizure]

catalepsy

Muscle rigidity, lack of awareness and the abnormal maintenance, often for long periods, of sometimes bizarre postures or attitudes. This was once a common feature of SCHIZOPHRENIA but seems to have become rare in recent years.

catalepsy

a seizure of the body, sometimes with loss of consciousness. The reaction can be a behavioural defence reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
As shown in Table 1, on day 15, there was no statistically significant effect on haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Although ALC-200 and ALC-500 showed the increasing then decreasing trend of catalepsy scores on 1/2 h to 4 h, it was statistically not different (P > 0.05).
(9) The findings of our study are also similar to those reported in an extensive review of international literature by Bhati et al., showing the most common signs of catatonia to be mutism, negativism, catalepsy, peculiar movements and echophenomena.
Haloperidol-induced catalepsy test: Thirty minutes after the last administrations of simvastation or saline to mice, 0.5mg/kg haloperidol was injected i.p.
Typically, MC is predominantly manifested by bizarre behavior and mutism, posturing, and catalepsy and with psychiatric disturbances.
and 4:00 p.m.): (1) catalepsy test; (2) assessment of oral movements 48 h after the 4th, 8th, 12th, 16th, and 20th injections; (3) discriminative avoidance task 24 h before (training) and after (testing) the 10th injection; (4) evaluation of open field behavior 48 h after the 20th injection.
While no consistent pattern was demonstrated between stress and akinetic and cataleptic motor behaviors, a significant negative correlation was shown between poststress latencies for catalepsy and extracellular DA concentrations, with a similar trend identified for akinesia.
According to DSM-5 criteria, the clinical presentation is dominated by the presence of at least three of the following symptoms: stupor, catalepsy, waxy flexibility, mutism, negativism, posturing, mannerism, stereotypy, agitation not influenced by external stimuli, grimacing, echolalia, and echopraxia (4, 6).
On the Curability of Certain Forms of Insanity, Epilepsy, Catalepsy, and Hysteria in Females by I Baker Brown.
(One should also strengthen the heart of people suffering from [other types] of melancholy, phrenitis, and catalepsy (jumud); for strengthening the heart of these people strengthens them [more generally] and invigorates their souls; therefore your treatment will have a beneficial effect.) Thus, in addition to purging and diet, al-Tabari prescribes social intercourse and entertainment as treatment.
If, however, the colonized person chooses assimilation, then he is trapped in a form of historical catalepsy because colonial education severs him from his own past" (1983: 5).
Acute effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on neurolepticinduced catalepsy in mice.