catabolism


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catabolism

 [kah-tab´o-lizm]
any destructive process by which complex substances are converted by living cells into simpler compounds, with release of energy; the opposite of anabolism. See also metabolism. adj., adj catabol´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ca·tab·o·lism

(kă-tab'ō-lizm),
1. The breaking down in the body of complex chemical compounds into simpler ones (for example, glycogen to CO2 and H2O), often accompanied by the liberation of energy.
2. The sum of all degradative processes.
Synonym(s): dissimilation (2)
Compare: anabolism, metabolism.
[G. katabolē, a casting down]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

catabolism

(kə-tăb′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The metabolic breakdown of complex molecules into simpler ones, often resulting in a release of energy.

cat′a·bol′ic (kăt′ə-bŏl′ĭk) adj.
cat′a·bol′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ca·tab·o·lism

(kă-tab'ō-lizm)
1. The breaking down in the body of complex chemical compounds into simpler ones, often accompanied by the liberation of energy.
2. The sum of all degradative processes.
Compare: anabolism, metabolism
[G. katabolē, a casting down]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

catabolism

The breakdown of complex body molecules to simpler forms, as when muscle protein breaks down to amino acids or fats to glycerol and fatty acids. The opposite process is called anabolism and both processes are encompassed in METABOLISM.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

catabolism

or

katabolism

a type of METABOLISM in which biochemical processes taking place in a cell result in the breaking down of complex compounds into simpler ones to release energy. Catabolism usually involves a series of step-by-step reactions, each catalysed by its own enzyme, for example, AEROBIC RESPIRATION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Catabolism

A process of metabolism that breaks down complex substances into simple ones.
Mentioned in: Interactions
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ca·tab·o·lism

(kă-tab'ō-lizm)
Breaking down in the body of complex chemical compounds into simpler ones.
[G. katabolē, a casting down]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The effects on the efficiency of threonine utilization ([bc.sup.-1]), calculated from results of chicken N-balance data within our N-utilization model for growing animals (Table 7) are not completely consistent with the results from in vitro catabolism in the chicken liver.
Even though plant growth on 0.33-[micro]M Mn was not different from adequate Mn, 0.33-[micro]M Mn resulted in significantly inhibited ureide catabolism in the leaves of Biloxi, which was previously found to be dependent on Mn, presumably a cofactor for allantoate amidohydrolase (Vadez and Sinclair, 2001a).
Increased mTOR activity can also stimulate mitochondrial electron transport chain activity [59], perhaps leading to increased mitochondrial catabolism of amino acids.
Suppression of BCAA Catabolism as a Driver of Liver Cancer Development and Progression
3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) lyase deficiency is a rare inborn error of leucine catabolism. The patient was admitted to the hospital with Reye-like syndrome and diagnosed with HMG-CoA lyase deficiency using organic acid analysis.
Using sophisticated computational methods we then identify the molecules that the cancer cells are using to escape the drug's actions, and conceive ways to block that escape route." "In this first application of our new approach to glutaminase inhibitors, our research focused on two specific energy pathways that cancer cells use: lipid catabolism, which is the breakdown of fats, and autophagy, in which cells derive energy by degrading parts of their own structure.
Halama continued: "In this first application of our new approach to glutaminase inhibitors, our research focused on two specific energy pathways that cancer cells use: lipid catabolism, which is the breakdown of fats, and autophagy, in which cells derive energy by degrading parts of their own structure.
3-OH-IVA excretion may be increased in multiple inherited and acquired disorders, affecting the pathway of leucine catabolism (Fig.
Attempts to modify the disease process have thus focused on these three areas, aiming to regulate cartilage catabolism and anabolism, control inflammation, and remodel subchondral bone (Rheumatology [Oxford].
Testosterone is the main anabolic, or muscle-building, hormone, whereas cortisol--often called the "stress hormone"--helps catabolism, or breaking down energy and fat stores for use, Liu explained.
Maple Syrup Urine disease (MSUD) is caused by the deficiency of the branched chain 2-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, the second common step in the catabolism of the three branched chain amino acids (BCAA), leucine, isoleucine and valine.