cat bite


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Related to cat bite: Cat scratch fever

cat bite

A wound inflicted by the teeth of a cat, typically a puncture wound on the hand or the arm. A cat bite is usually infected with several aerobic and anaerobic organisms, including Pasteurella multocida. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are required. About 20% of the time, the wound does not respond to antibiotic therapy and needs incision and drainage or débridement.
See also: bite
References in periodicals archive ?
Vets all know that cat bites can transmit bacteria, such as Pasteurella, Fusobacteria and Streptococci, and that Cat Scratch fever, caused by Bartonella henselae, is debilitating at best, so bites and scratches are taken very seriously.
Regarding animal bites, 3%-18% of dog bites and 28%-80% of cat bites become infected (2,3); 50% of dog bites and 75% of cat bites are associated with the presence of Pasteurella multocida (3), which can be frequently detected as part of the oral microbiota in various animals such as cats, dogs, pigs, and various wild animals (2,3).
The 2014 guidelines for diagnosis and management of skin and soft tissue infections recommend an antibiotic prophylaxis for infections due to dog or cat bites for patients who are immunocompromised, asplenic, or with advanced liver disease; an antimicrobial therapy is also recommended when there is an important local reaction in the site of bite or when the injuries are moderate to severe.
People can prevent catching cat-scratch disease by washing wounds promptly after a cat bite or scratch and by thoroughly washing hands after playing with a cat.
Septic arthritis and osteomyelitis from a cat bite. Yale J Biol Med.
Erysipelas-like cellulitis with Pasteurella multocida bacteremia after a cat bite. Craaf Med J.
Fraction of patients seeking medical attention for a cat bite to the hand who needed to be hospitalized during a three-year study
At this point of time, I think there are more chances of a 'cheetah bite' then a cat bite.
A cat bite or scratch may cause painful burning and swelling in the body.
are the most common pathogens found in dog and cat bite wounds (typically P.
This most often occurs if the cat bite or lick is near the eye or if there is self-infection from another site (Spach & Myers, 2005; Busen & Scarborough, 1997; Ormerod & Dailey, 1999).
Among dog bite victims, 58 percent were male and 42 percent were female while among cat bite victims, 15 percent were male and 85 percent were female ([P.sub.2][less than]0.001).