casuistry

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cas·ui·stry

(kăz'wĭ-strē),
A decision-making method used in biomedical ethics; based on previous experience with similar cases.
[L. casus, case]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Compare Charles Fried's casual treatment of a classic nonlegal dilemma, that "[o]ne who provides an expensive education for his own children surely cannot be blamed because he does not use these resources to alleviate famine or to save lives in some distant land," (122) with the full casuistical analysis of the same problem conducted by ethicist Garth Hallett in his book Priorities and Christian Ethics.
Indeed, these two chapters exhibit "fruit" of the kind of analysis Cookson advocates in prescribing "casuistical free exercise jurisprudence." In a sense her demonstrations of this preferred approach seem much more effective than her discussions about what comprises it.
While the work repays study as casuistical, and is written in a "form that gestured towards a [...] public audience" (152), its emphasis on personal control is one reason why Siemens sees it as deeply personal, though not the "ready suicide note" that John Carey suggests (139, 153).
Moreover, they owe little to moral theorizing generally, whether the abstract variety exemplified by Kant, Sidgwick, or Rawls, or the casuistical variety exemplified by Judith Thomson.
Cookson proposes that a casuistical free exercise jurisprudence can offer a fair and more just alternative process for resolving the conflict of principles which underlie most free exercise cases.
The key, I think, is to place him in the context of the casuistical tradition in which he writes.
According to the court, about half of the pamphlet related to "casuistical and controversial questions which are not obscene, but the remainder of the pamphlet is obscene in fact as relating to impure and filthy acts, words, and ideas" (363).
But, as he says, there are parallels; indeed, he speaks of "[t]he place of casuistical analysis in Tudor legal discourse" as being "well established".
(7) I discuss conscience in Richard III in more detail and from a different perspective in The Casuistical Tradition in Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, and Milton (Princeton U.
All summer, serious newspapers have felt it necessary to publish casuistical Op-Eds by apologists for "creation science"--and the Old Testament is the only biology textbook you really need, these clever fellows forgot to add.
All summer, serious newspapers have felt it necessary to publish casuistical Op-Eds by apologists for "creation science"-and the Old Testament is the only biology textbook you really need, these clever fellows forgot to add.