casuistics

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casuistics

 [kaz″u-is´tiks]
the recording and study of cases of disease.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

casuistics

(kăz-ū-ĭs′tĭks) [L. casus, chance]
1. Analysis of clinical case records to establish the general characteristics of a disease.
2. In moral questions, the determination of right and wrong by application of ethical principles to a particular case.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(145) This reflects a wide descriptive consensus among leading commentators on the casuistic nature of fiduciary duties.
There he brings his natural casuistic instincts to bear as he analyzes the debates about deontology and proportionalism, (100) autonomous morality and an ethics of faith, rightness and goodness, magisterial authority and dissent.
Our casuistic is composed mostly of contacts who have a white skin color on the other hand, these patients are examined by experienced specialized professionals using standardized procedures.
This, therefore, was the motive of the casuistic character of the study and its inclusion in the Treaty of Charity.
Examining the ways by which the Roman jurists, in their casuistic manner, found their law,...
He's a skilled debater, at times clever and beguiling, but always casuistic and willing to hit below the belt.
For many observers the whole unseemly farce that evening in Munich had been stage-managed, written and directed by casuistic promoter Frank Warren, who would match flailing frogs for a fight if some idiot would buy a ticket.
Though his casuistic treatment of the cases he considers is insightful, Richards' theory of the acquisition of parental rights seems incomplete.
There are two basic approaches for analyzing the bioethical challenges in terms of religious convictions: a hermeneutical manner and a casuistic argumentation.
Of course, there is a long history here of casuistic accommodation.