castration anxiety


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Related to castration anxiety: castration complex, Electra complex

cas·tra·tion com·plex

1. a child's fear of injury to the genitals by the parent of the same gender as punishment for unconcious guilt over oedipal feelings;
2. fantasized loss of the penis by a female or fear of its actual loss by a male;
3. unconscious fear of injury from those in authority.
Synonym(s): castration anxiety

castration anxiety

1 the fantasized fear of injury or loss of the genital organs, often as the reaction to a repressed feeling of punishment for forbidden sexual desires. It may also be caused by some apparently threatening everyday occurrence, such as a humiliating experience, loss of a job, or loss of authority.
2 a general threat to the masculinity or femininity of a person or an unrealistic fear of bodily injury or loss of power. Also called anxiety complex. See also anxiety disorder. Compare penis envy.
Anxiety due to perceived/fantasised danger or fear of injury to the genitalia and/or body, precipitated by everyday events with symbolic significance which appear threatening, such as loss of a job, loss of a tooth, or experiencing ridicule or humiliation

castration anxiety

Psychiatry Anxiety due to fantasized danger or injuries to the genitals and/or body, precipitated by everyday events with symbolic significance which appear threatening, such as loss of a job, loss of a tooth, or an experience of ridicule or humiliation

castration anxiety (kastrā´shən),

n 1. the fantasized fear of injury to or loss of the genital organs.
2. a general threat to the body image of a person or the unrealistic fear of bodily injury or loss of power or control.
References in periodicals archive ?
The British Library became a dissection room while I conjured up former lovers, one-night stands, it was a large but finite number, I conjured them up in search for castration anxiety, but found no such thing.
The problem wasn't so much the reality of castration anxiety and whether it was symbolic, whether the phallus was an emblem of a desire that could never be attained.
Near the conclusion, this resolution of Freud's will come up again as I demonstrate how, in the clinical situation (as well as in other realms of discourse), a manifest fear of loss of the object's love may serve as a screen for castration anxiety.
To convey the quality of these misapprehensions of female experience, I will cite examples from the work of two contemporary analysts, whose explorations of castration anxiety otherwise serve to advance the psychoanalytic theory of sexuality.
In the discussion of perversion and castration anxiety that follows, it will be important to keep in mind that fetishistic transactions are not identical with screen memories and other screening functions but only analogous to them.
To dispense with the fetish is unacceptable since it would expose Hemingway to intolerable castration anxiety - making women "inadequate" and forcing him towards what he would consider an unacceptable homosexuality.
As Freud states on several occasions, both in the case history and in Inhibitions, Symptoms and Anxiety, Hans' phobia is the expression of castration anxiety and a failed oedipus complex.
The next step in the development of anxiety occurs during the phallic phase of mental development: castration anxiety.
If the figure of woman always evokes castration anxiety, if men could tolerate neither woman-as-woman nor woman-as-man, then surely cinema would have compensated by showing only ambisexual Peter Pans.
Without feeling qualified to adjudicate these intricacies of revisionist psychoanalytic terminology, I'll accept for the moment Gabbard's version of the phallic mother which has "other functions besides relieving the male child's castration anxiety by reassuring him that women are just like he is.
The male's castration anxiety leads him to regard the fetish with a peculiar form of intrapsychic splitting in which the fetish is both a denial and a confirmation that women are castrated.
This myth of the phallic mother, however, has other functions besides relieving the male child's castration anxiety by reassuring him that women are just like he is.