castration anxiety


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Related to castration anxiety: castration complex, Electra complex

cas·tra·tion com·plex

1. a child's fear of injury to the genitals by the parent of the same gender as punishment for unconcious guilt over oedipal feelings;
2. fantasized loss of the penis by a female or fear of its actual loss by a male;
3. unconscious fear of injury from those in authority.
Synonym(s): castration anxiety
Anxiety due to perceived/fantasised danger or fear of injury to the genitalia and/or body, precipitated by everyday events with symbolic significance which appear threatening, such as loss of a job, loss of a tooth, or experiencing ridicule or humiliation

castration anxiety

Psychiatry Anxiety due to fantasized danger or injuries to the genitals and/or body, precipitated by everyday events with symbolic significance which appear threatening, such as loss of a job, loss of a tooth, or an experience of ridicule or humiliation
References in periodicals archive ?
I started giggling mentally at Sigmund F's universal concept of castration anxiety. I began to like the way it sounded.
The British Library became a dissection room while I conjured up former lovers, one-night stands, it was a large but finite number, I conjured them up in search for castration anxiety, but found no such thing.
We now see that there is no danger of our regarding castration anxiety as the sole motive force of the defensive processes which lead to neurosis ...
Near the conclusion, this resolution of Freud's will come up again as I demonstrate how, in the clinical situation (as well as in other realms of discourse), a manifest fear of loss of the object's love may serve as a screen for castration anxiety. If the analyst is not aware of the screening function of various forms of anxiety, she may become implicated in a fetishistic transaction, where a vivid figuration of absence may be a screen for a threatening presence.
To dispense with the fetish is unacceptable since it would expose Hemingway to intolerable castration anxiety - making women "inadequate" and forcing him towards what he would consider an unacceptable homosexuality.
The origin of the "nonsense" is connected otherwise to its expression than in a strictly substitutive relation to castration anxiety. The father continually fails to hear these relations, even when they are emphasized, "betont," by Hans himself.
As Freud states on several occasions, both in the case history and in Inhibitions, Symptoms and Anxiety, Hans' phobia is the expression of castration anxiety and a failed oedipus complex.
The movies that continue to speak to us are precisely those which challenge the gender conventions of their time and toy with (rather that simply compensating for or satisfying) even such basic Freudian immutables as castration anxiety and penis envy.
(If the figure of woman always evokes castration anxiety, if men could tolerate neither woman-as-woman nor woman-as-man, then surely cinema would have compensated by showing only ambisexual Peter Pans.)
The male's castration anxiety leads him to regard the fetish with a peculiar form of intrapsychic splitting in which the fetish is both a denial and a confirmation that women are castrated.
This myth of the phallic mother, however, has other functions besides relieving the male child's castration anxiety by reassuring him that women are just like he is.
If the images evoke castration anxiety, what is their effect on the woman spectator, who, presumably, cannot lose what she never had?