caseload


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caseload

The total number of patients managed by a particular health care professional or agency.
References in periodicals archive ?
In repatriating and resettling the remaining caseload, Rev.
She added: "Without a caseload, you are more accessible for patients and relatives."
Reynolds clarified that he doesn't expect the new prosecutor's policies to solve the caseload problem.
The comptroller's office says part of the reduction in the foreclosure caseload could be due to changes in the housing market and the broader economy.
"Unlike methods of judicial resource allocation that are based on population or raw, unweighted caseloads, the weighted caseload method explicitly incorporates the differences in judicial workload associated with different types of cases, producing a more accurate and nuanced profile of the need for judges in each court."
Lack of adequate preparation could be presumed if the attorney's caseload exceeded the maximums recommended by the ABA.
"Our people are grappling with more calls, incidents, crimes and caseloads. This is at a time when, despite our substantial step-up in recruiting, we are yet to close the gap created by the steady stream of retirements since we last recruited some years ago.
"As a percentage of the overall caseload, civil appeals increased, and criminal cases decreased.
Considering that many Filipinos continue to report personal encounters with corrupt officials, a caseload representing less than 1 percent of government employees must be seen as still low.
Texas "has an insufficient number of caseworkers, forcing caseworkers to carry over double the caseload limits under recognized standards, putting children at risk," the advocacy group wrote on its website, adding that many foster children "languish in care without permanent homes."
To support this continuity of care for women, New Zealand midwives are able to work as a Lead Maternity Carer (LMC) and provide care to a caseload of women.