casefinding

casefinding

(kās″fīnd′ĭng)
An active attempt to identify persons who have a certain disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Active TB screening and casefinding programmes for pregnant women are an important way to improve maternal/infant health and survival in TB-endemic settings.
And despite the current procurement model having delivered substantial savings to the NHS, these savings have not always led to increases in casefinding and treatment numbers.
Blomquist, "Tuberculosis casefinding, 1961," Public Health Reports, vol.
The objectives of the investigation were to conduct casefinding and review health histories of infected persons, to determine the source of transmission and implement control measures, to identify other patients at risk for exposure, and to assist in development of recommendations to prevent HCV transmission in health-care settings.
"Profile of Medicare Beneficiaries with AIDS: Application of AIDS Casefinding Algorithm." Health Care Financing Review 19 (3): 19-38.
Comparison of three casefinding strategies relative to elderly alcohol abusers.
SAN DIEGO -- Consider the site of use when selecting brief casefinding instruments for late-life depression, Cynthia Gruman, Ph.D., advised in a poster session at the annual meeting of the Gerontological Society of America.
The Partners in Asthma Management Study, a comprehensive school health promotion intervention, includes four components: casefinding, medical care liaison, self-management training, and environmental control.
Casefinding also acts as an impetus for screening pregnant exposed women.
The article discusses the AIDS epidemic and Medicare eligibility rules in relation to AIDS, describes the casefinding process and the evidence supporting its potential accuracy, and presents our findings from applying this casefinding process to a 100-percent sample of Medicare beneficiaries from 1991-93.
Gostin et al., The Case Against Compulsory Casefinding in Controlling AIDS--Testing, Screening and Reporting, 12 Am.