case-fatality ratio

case-fatality ratio

Epidemiology A value calculated as 100 cases of a disease 'X', divided by the number of persons with the disease who died in a given period of time; the resulting ratio is equal to the rate of a disease's occurrence. See Cause-fatality ratio.
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Nosebleed, an indicator of disease severity in nonfatal confirmed cases, was noted on 10.8% of case report forms for surviving patients in 2017, but this frequency declined to 2.6% in 2018 (75.9% decrease), and the case-fatality ratio among confirmed and probable cases declined from 43.9% in 2017 to 25.8% in 2018 (41.2% decrease).
Aggressive antibiotic treatment is usually given considering the case-fatality ratio of meningococcal disease is estimated to be between 10 percent and 15 percent, and even higher in the Philippines (case-fatality ratio of meningococcemia is more than 50 percent).
The median age of persons with laboratory-confirmed cases of yellow fever was 31 years (range = 0-72 years) and 86.4% were male; eight deaths occurred among confirmed cases (case-fatality ratio = 21.6%) (Table).
Close scrutiny will reveal that this is less a reflection of fewer attempts and more the result of a lower case-fatality ratio due to a decline in the use of the most lethal pesticides.
Surveillance data from 1993-2009 show that while 86% of children under 5 years of age who contract meningococcal disease are hospitalized, the case-fatality ratio is low, ranging from 1% for serogroup Y to 10% for serogroup C.
Surveillance data for 1993-2009 show that while 86% of children under 5 years of age who contract meningococcal disease are hospitalized, the case-fatality ratio is low, ranging from 1% for serogroup Y to 10% for serogroup C.
Of the cases reported in 2008, 25 (6%) were stillborn and 3 (1%) died within 30 days of delivery, for a case-fatality ratio of 6.5%.
Decision making based on flu severity in New York City proved challenging, given that the case-fatality ratio was unknown.
"The observed gene differences between these strains might individually or collectively explain why modern 027 strains are more likely to be epidemic and could explain the higher case-fatality ratio and persistence associated with infection by these strains," said Wren.
Second, a new highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5NI had emerged as pan-epizootic in 2003 and caused occasional human infection with high case-fatality ratio in a few countries (1,2).
In the studies reviewed, the near-miss ratio reported varied from 0.3/1,000 to 101.7/ 1,000 deliveries and the case-fatality ratio varied from 2:1 to 223:1.
A new virus, named Marburg virus, was isolated from patients and monkeys, and the high case-fatality ratio called for the best biocontainment of the day.