case law


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

com·mon law

(kom'ŏn law)
A system of law based on custom, tradition, and court decisions rather than on written legislation.

case law

Opinions or decisions made by the courts.
See also: law
References in periodicals archive ?
So, why was 2015 an important year for ediscovery case law? According to Lange, in 2015 on the cusp of FRCP amendments, courts dealt with many key issues that the FRCP amendments sought to address -- what data needs to be preserved, the amount of discovery reasonably needed in a case and what happens when ESI is lost or destroyed.
From negotiated procurements processes and small business issues to standards of conduct and alleged bias, Key Case Law Rules for Government Contract Formation documents key language, cites relevant cases, and offers up commentary essential to any federal legal requirements reader in a 'must have' reference for acquisition professionals.
From the point of view of EU law, given the non-harmonised nature of the sector, the only requirements are those flowing from the treaty and case law. As I have already said, member states can introduce some restrictions to freedoms of movement provided that they are coherent with the objective of general interest that they pursue, are proportional and non-discriminatory.
The concept of comparative advertising within the meaning of the directive is very broad and the court has ample case law on the subject.
When I finally read the case law, I realized I was wrong, but I still see many attorneys coming to that incorrect, but understandable, conclusion.
To assist with this, the CalCPA Family Law Section has been summarizing statutes and case law involving the determination of income available for child and spousal support.
The 2007 Bush-Cheney Impeachments: Year 2008 10th Grade Civics Exam by Civil Rights Advocate and attorney Craig Leslie draws upon his expertise earned in over fifteen years of practicing case law to lay out the complete case to date for impeaching President George W.
Under the existing case law, the presumption is that the advice is not privileged because it is considered "business advice" or "accountant's work" and not legal advice.
While there is little case law exploring the contours of the common interest doctrine under these circumstances, it is apparent that a court would need to consider the unique facts of each particular case, including the course of dealing between the carrier and the insured as well as the nature of the documents or information at issue.
Yet, in dangerous activities, it appears that officers will take advantage of ambiguous legal situations and stretch the law to its limits--searching as necessary." Officers use their discretion to protect themselves from rapidly unfolding street situations not specifically guided by sterile case law. Eterno also found that search situations involving a bright-line rule were more likely to be followed than situations without a bright-line rule.
And the "plain sight provision" for car carry, "under Ohio case law, is a legal fiction and cannot be reliably complied with by a law-abiding citizen, no matter how well intentioned they are." In Ohio, according to Hanson, police can legally void the requirement for a search warrant and search a car because they can see a gun in plain sight, and at the same time arrest the car's occupant, a CHL holder, because his gun was not in plain sight.