cartogram

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cartogram

a map showing the distribution of a population by area.
References in periodicals archive ?
Raisz, The rectangular statistical cartogram, Geographical Review, 24 (1934), 292-296.
org), but Tyner's unusually straightforward, concise explanations of value-by-area and distance-by-time cartograms, including ones that are less often seen (such as linear and radial cartograms), are refreshing.
The cartograms illustrate the fact that Bangladesh is not a small country but is one where many people live, where many pregnant women need care, where children are being born, and where too many are dying.
For the equipped engine's with the model supposed by the author, have been raised up on the engine stall, the main cartograms for the injection's times, at totally and partially task (Grunwald, 1980) and the enrichment's coefficient at the totally task which are presented in the figure no.
Michael Gastner, Cosma Shalizi, and Mark Newman, "Maps and Cartograms of the 2004 US Presidential Election Results" (Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Accessed January 3, 2006), www-personal.
13) See Michael Gastner, Cosma Shalizi and Mark Newman, Maps and Cartograms of the 2004 US Presidential Election Results, http://www-personal.
Now, two researchers have turned to the physics of diffusion to develop a new, speedy technique for generating cartograms by computer.
Eleven categories of visual representations emerged from the classification: graphs, tables, graphical tables, time charts, networks, structure diagrams, process diagrams, maps, cartograms, icons, and pictures.
Both Dorling (1992) and Upton (1989, 1991) have placed these arrows on cartograms, thereby illustrating the geography of variations in electoral change.
availability of agrochemical database, acidity cartograms, agrochemical field passports, availability of qualified personnel, performance of relevant activities for at least five years; - availability of planning and cartographic bases with applied soil varieties, boundaries of fields, work sites, their numbers and route routes, the depths of the humus horizon
These two categories provide the basis for this month's cartograms in which the distribution of doctors, nurses and midwives - as well as their shortage and surplus numbers - are depicted Not included in these maps are dentists, pharmaceutical personnel and the surgical workforce.
Cartograms can be very effective in conveying messages that otherwise could be missed if mapped following the "true" geography (size and shape) of the mapped area.