carrion


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Car·ri·ón

(kah-rē-on[h]'),
Daniel A., Peruvian medical student, 1859-1885, who inoculated himself with a disease later designated as Carrión disease, and died thereof. See: Carrión disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

carrion

(kăr′ē-ən)
n.
Dead and decaying flesh.
adj.
1. Of or similar to dead and decaying flesh.
2. Feeding on such flesh.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Accordingly, Carrion contended, she was entitled to a preliminary injunction blocking any distribution of the fee that D'Angelo Law collected on the PI settlement.
That's why he has to compete in all these tournaments,' Carrion told the Philippine Sportswriters Association Forum on Tuesday at the Tapa King Restaurant in Farmers Plaza, Cubao.
"I'm working hard to get his visa," said Carrion, who added that International Gymastics Federation president Morinari Watanabe of Japan is helping Yulo facilitate his German visa.
In the chapter "Bookshops Fated to Be Political," Carrion moves between Hitler's Germany to Cold War Berlin and, not surprisingly, to Cuba, to discuss the role bookshops have played in fomenting and propping up totalitarian regimes.
In particular, carrion beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae) utilize carcasses to carry out their life cycles and represent novel models for behavioral ecology (Ratcliffe 1996).
Richard Carrion, executive chairman of Banco Popular, testified at a hearing organized by the Senate Judiciary Committee that the commonwealth's current debt problems are the result of years of fiscal mismanagement and of government policies that have held back economic growth.
There are a number of reports of Heteroptera collected at carrion or other animal parts (dried skin, bones, etc.).
Until today, unsophisticated methods have been used to trap beetles in affected areas using bait (carrion), and then using these trap-counts as evidence that the beetle is present, therefore making the area off-limits for development.
Thus, we evaluated the susceptibility of the European equivalent of the American crow, carrion crows (Corvuscorone), which are ubiquitously present across Europe, by injecting them with selected strains of WNV circulating in Europe and with the prototypic NY99 strain.