modulation

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modulation

 [mod″u-la´shun]
the normal capacity of cell adaptability to its environment.
antigenic modulation the alteration of antigenic determinants in a living cell surface membrane following interaction with antibody.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mod·u·la·tion

(mod'yū-lā'shŭn),
1. The functional and morphologic fluctuation of cells in response to changing environmental conditions.
2. Systematic variation in a characteristic (for example, frequency, amplitude) of a sustained oscillation to code additional information.
3. A change in the kinetics of an enzyme or metabolic pathway.
4. The regulation of the rate of translation of mRNA by a modulating codon.
[L. modulor, to measure off properly]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

modulation

The regulation of the rate at which a specific gene is transcribed.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mod·u·la·tion

(mod'yŭ-lā'shŭn)
1. The functional and morphologic fluctuation of cells in response to changing environmental conditions.
2. Systematic variation in a characteristic (e.g., frequency, amplitude) of a sustained oscillation to code additional information.
3. A change in the kinetics of an enzyme or metabolic pathway.
4. The regulation of the rate of translation of mRNA by a modulating codon.
5. Change in parameters of electrotherapy (e.g., frequency, amplitude).
[L. modulor, to measure off properly]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This solution contain also an envelop and carrier wave, and has also a mass centre, its position is at [x'.sub.0], which is the position of the microscopic particle.
Typical Ratio, BW/CW Technology modulation frequency AM broadcasting Amplitude Very small [much less than] 1 FM radio and television Frequency Very small [much less than] 1 Mobile communications Pulse and Very small [much less than] 1 Frequency Radar Pulse Modest < 1 Ultra-wideband, spread Short pulse Large ~ 1 spectrum Peak/avgerage Technology amplitude Examples [CW frequency (GHz)] AM broadcasting ~ 2 AM radio (~ 0.001) FM radio and television ~ 1 FM radio (~ 0.1) Mobile communications ~ 10 UMTS, TETRA, GSM, TDMA, CDMA, (~ 0.4-2) Radar 100 Airport radar (~ 4) Ultra-wideband, spread 100 Military applications (~ 2-20) spectrum Abbreviations: BW, bandwidth; CW, carrier wave. Adapted from Foster and Repacholi (2004).
Both the navigation message and tracking codes are modulated on the carrier wave, a continuous radio signal at the L1 frequency.
Here, for the PWM, the carrier wave is chaotic in nature and the modulating signal remains the same, that is, DC signal [10].
A carrier wave is compared with a sinusoidal reference wave to turn the switches on or off.
The light forms an electromagnetic carrier wave that is modulated to carry information Applications of fiber optics include: telecommunications, Local Area Networks (LANs) and Wide Area Networks (WANs), factory automation and premises wiring (Intelligent Telecommunication System.
5, we used the sinusoidal PWM and DPWM control strategies and we took into account the following values: inductive load R=10[ohm], L=10mH, amplitude modulation index [m.sub.a] = 0.95, carrier wave frequency 50Hz, switching frequency 5kHz, and supply voltage amplitude [U.sub.d] = 310 V.
Whereas Sheidrake brings in the idea of a morphic field to explain group animal behaviour, Chandler thinks that there is a modulation of a carrier wave shared by other members of the species.
Then, the carrier wave gets subtracted to put the signal into baseband -- that is, a power level and speed that ordinary digital processors can handle.
This type of system locates positions using the carrier wave of the GPS signal and a signal emanating from a reference station very close to tractor operations, on the corner of the test site.

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