carpal bone


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Related to carpal bone: metacarpal bone, tarsal bone

carpal bone

One of the eight wrist bones, which are aligned in two rows. The proximal row contains (from the thumb to the little finger) the scaphoid, lunate, triquetral, and pisiform bones. The distal row contains (from thumb to little finger) the trapezium, trapezoid, capitate, and hamate bones.
See also: bone
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, in this randomized controlled trial, treating effects of carpal bone mobilization combined with night splinting is studied and compared with night splinting as the control group.
Because the carpal bone image is noisy, the complexity of the skeletal structure in the hand and the variability between different subjects makes very difficult to realize an automatic segmentation of the bones.
The rest followed diagnosis that Oath had cracked the third carpal bone in his near-fore knee after disappointing in the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Diamond Stakes on July 24-his first run since gaining his Epsom win.
It's the opposite leg to that with the splint, but X-rays have revealed it's the third carpal bone.
Designed to reduce the risk of soft tissue irritation associated with traditional wrist fusion plates, Acumed's new Total Wrist Fusion Plating System, fuses the carpal bones together to treat post-traumatic arthritis.
Carpal bones showed delayed ossification and irregular margins.
The carpal bones are rotated, which puts increased stress on the ring finger, which along with the long finger is most often involved in injury.
Only a true lateral view will show the dorsal displacement of the metacarpals relative to the carpal bones.
The back wall of the carpal tunnel is bound by the carpal bones and a band of strong tissue called transverse carpal ligament.
The carpal tunnel is a space located posteriorly between the carpal bones of the wrist (moving from fight to left: trapezium, trapezoid, capitate, and hamate), forming the hard "carpal floor," and anteriorly, where the transverse carpal ligament forms a fibrous sheath or the "carpal roof" (see Fig 1).