carotid sheath


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Related to carotid sheath: recurrent laryngeal nerve

sheath

 [shēth]
a tubular case or envelope.
arachnoid sheath the delicate membrane between the pial sheath and the dural sheath of the optic nerve.
carotid sheath a portion of the cervical fascia enclosing the carotid artery, internal jugular vein, vagus nerve, and sympathetic nerves supplying the head.
connective tissue sheath of Key and Retzius endoneurium.
crural sheath femoral sheath.
dural sheath the external investment of the optic nerve.
femoral sheath the fascial sheath of the femoral vessels.
Henle's sheath endoneurium.
lamellar sheath the perineurium.
medullary sheath myelin sheath.
myelin sheath (nerve sheath) the sheath surrounding the axon of myelinated nerve cells, consisting of concentric layers of myelin formed in the peripheral nervous system by the plasma membrane of Schwann cells, and in the central nervous system by the plasma membrane of oligodendrocytes. It is interrupted at intervals along the length of the axon by gaps known as nodes of Ranvier. Myelin is an electrical insulator that serves to speed the conduction of nerve impulses (see saltatory conduction).
pial sheath the innermost of the three sheaths of the optic nerve.
root sheath the epidermic layer of a hair follicle.
sheath of Schwann neurilemma.
synovial sheath synovial membrane lining the cavity of a bone through which a tendon moves.
tendon sheath a lubricated fibrous or synovial layer of tissue in which the tendon is housed and through which it moves.

ca·rot·id sheath

[TA]
the dense fibrous investment of the carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve on each side of the neck, deep to the sternocleidomastoid muscle; the layers of cervical fascia blend with it.
Synonym(s): vagina carotica [TA]

ca·rot·id sheath

(kă-rot'id shēth) [TA]
The dense fibrous investment of the carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve on each side of the neck, deep to the sternocleidomastoid muscle; the layers of cervical fascia blend with it.
Synonym(s): vagina carotica [TA] .

ca·rot·id sheath

(kă-rot'id shēth) [TA]
Dense fibrous investment of carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve on each side of the neck.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most patients with cervical primary lesions present with a welldefined mass posterior to the carotid sheath vessels with or without intraspinal extension and with or without calcification.
CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: From its origin, the aberrant muscle deviated laterally crossing in front of the common carotid artery (shown in photograph) to ascend in the anterior wall of carotid sheath. The direction of the muscle and its relation to common carotid artery makes it likely for the muscle to compress the artery which could result in clinical symptoms.
In conclusion, in our case of extranodal Rosai-Dorfman disease, which presented as an infiltrative mass of the carotid sheath, the diagnosis was particularly difficult to make because it was an unusual presentation of a rare disease.
Contrast enhanced CT scan is the best initial diagnostic study to determine the size and extent of tumor, possible origin of tumor based on displacement of carotid sheath and preservation of parapharyngeal fat and to demonstrate degree of tumor vascularity.
(1-3) To our knowledge, no solitary fibrous tumor arising in the carotid sheath has been reported until now.
It also extended medially into the parapharyngeal space anterior to the carotid sheath (figure 1, C).
The sternocleidomastoid muscle was then retracted laterally, exposing the carotid sheath. The sheath was opened, exposing an apparently normal IJV without a palpable thrombus.
Computed tomography of the brain and neck demonstrated a large retropharyngeal abscess, an abscess in the left parapharyngeal space, and a small collection adjacent to the right carotid sheath at the level of C4; the cervical vertebrae and lungs were normal.
MRI demonstrated a left supraglottic mass, as well as a tumor in the left carotid sheath, which had possibly arisen from the left vagus nerve.
Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the neck demonstrated a left carotid sheath mass centered at the carotid bifurcation.
The infection classically involves the mediastinum via two routes: (1) by fascial spread along the carotid sheath inferiorly into the mediastinum or (2) by spread through the retropharyngeal space, into the prevertebral space (danger space), and inferiorly into the mediastinum.
Although the mass was adherent to the carotid sheath, it was successfully peeled off.