carotid canal


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canal

 [kah-nal´]
a relatively narrow tubular passage or channel.
adductor canal Hunter's canal.
Alcock's canal a tunnel formed by a splitting of the obturator fascia, which encloses the pudendal vessels and nerve.
alimentary canal see alimentary canal.
anal canal the terminal portion of the alimentary canal, from the rectum to the anus.
atrioventricular canal the common canal connecting the primordial atrium and ventricle; it sometimes persists as a congenital anomaly.
birth canal the canal through which the fetus passes in birth.
carotid canal one in the pars petrosa of the temporal bone, transmitting the internal carotid artery to the cranial cavity.
cervical canal the part of the uterine cavity lying within the cervix.
condylar canal an occasional opening in the condylar fossa for transmission of the transverse sinus; called also posterior condyloid foramen.
canal of Corti a space between the outer and inner rods of Corti.
femoral canal the cone-shaped medial part of the femoral sheath lateral to the base of Gimbernat's ligament.
haversian canal any of the anastomosing channels of the haversian system in compact bone, containing blood and lymph vessels, and nerves.
Hunter's canal a fascial tunnel in the middle third of the medial part of the thigh, containing the femoral vessels and saphenous nerve. Called also adductor canal.
hypoglossal canal an opening in the occipital bone, transmitting the hypoglossal nerve and a branch of the posterior meningeal artery; called also anterior condyloid foramen.
infraorbital canal a small canal running obliquely through the floor of the orbit, transmitting the infraorbital vessels and nerve.
inguinal canal the oblique passage in the lower anterior abdominal wall on either side, through which passes the round ligament of the uterus in the female, and the spermatic cord in the male.
medullary canal
optic canal a passage for the optic nerve and ophthalmic artery at the apex of the orbit; called also optic foramen.
pulp canal root canal.
root canal that part of the pulp cavity extending from the pulp chamber to the apical foramen. Called also pulp canal.
sacral canal the continuation of the spinal canal through the sacrum.
Schlemm's canal venous sinus of sclera.
semicircular c's see semicircular canals.
spinal canal (vertebral canal) the canal formed by the series of vertebral foramina together, enclosing the spinal cord and meninges.
Volkmann's c's canals communicating with the haversian canals, for passage of blood vessels through bone.

ca·rot·id ca·nal

[TA]
a passage through the petrous part of the temporal bone from its inferior surface upward, medially, and anteriorly to the apex where it opens posterior and superior to the site of the foramen lacerum. It transmits the internal carotid artery and accompanying plexuses of veins and autonomic nerves.
Synonym(s): canalis caroticus [TA]

ca·rot·id ca·nal

(kă-rot'id kă-nal') [TA]
A passage through the petrous part of the temporal bone from its inferior surface upward, medially, and forward to the apex where it opens into the foramen lacerum. It transmits the internal carotid artery and plexuses of veins and autonomic nerves.
Synonym(s): canalis caroticus [TA] .

ca·rot·id ca·nal

(kă-rot'id kă-nal') [TA]
A passage through the petrous part of the temporal bone from its inferior surface upward, medially, and anteriorly to the apex where it opens posterior and superior to the site of the foramen lacerum.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the current study the mean distance between the medial external margins of the left an right carotid canals is 52.1 mm, while the mean distance between the left and right foramen lacerum is 20.1 mm.
Along the imaginary lines defined, the following distances were measured (Using digital Vernier caliper of 0.01 mm of accuracy) from HS to foramen ovale, jugular foramen and carotid canal of the middle cranial base.
The neoplasm was found to fill the entire petrous apex and involve the intrapetrous portion of the carotid canal, but it was easily dissected from the internal carotid artery.
(1,4,5) Since cholesterol granulomas can cause extensive petrous bone erosion into the jugular foremen or carotid canal, it is an essential part of preoperative planning to use an imaging modality that highlights vascular structures.
The petrous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) represents the continuation of the cervical portion of the ICA as it enters the petrous portion of the temporal bone via the carotid canal. It is surrounded by various clinically significant structures, including the cochlea, middle ear, eustachian tube, gasserian ganglion, geniculate ganglion, greater superficial petrosal nerve, and jugular fossa.
At the superior border of the thyroid cartilage, it ascends from the common carotid bifurcation superiorly to enter the carotid canal in the petrous portion of the temporal bone.
The scans revealed that the carotid canal on the affected side was slightly smaller than the canal on the opposite side; CT also suggested some dehiscence of the right carotid canal in the anteroinferior quadrant of the middle ear (figure 1).
During a previous evaluation, computed tomography (CT) of the internal auditory canals and contrast-enhanced CT of the neck had detected a soft-tissue abnormality in the region of the left nasopharynx and the left carotid canal. Positron-emission tomography showed uptake in the left skull base, which raised the possibility of a malignancy.
Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone (3-mm serial cuts) demonstrated (1) heterogenously enhancing densities with loculated collections in the left middle ear and mastoid cavities, (2) gross destruction of the mastoid portion of the left temporal bone, left occipital bone, and adjacent basisphenoid bone, and (3) destruction of the carotid canal, jugular foramen, and styloid process (figure 2).
Magnetic resonance imaging revealed extensive tumor recurrence in the left parotid bed and carotid canal. The patient underwent salvage surgery and adjuvant neutron-beam radiotherapy; the surgery included a total parotidectomy and lateral skull base resection.
The internal carotid artery enters the carotid canal in the petrous portion of the temporal bone.