carotid

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carotid

 [kah-rot´id]
pertaining to the principal artery of the neck (the carotid artery). See anatomic Table of Arteries in the Appendices.
carotid endarterectomy surgical removal of atherosclerotic plaques within an extracranial carotid artery, usually the common carotid, done to prevent stroke in patients with 70 per cent or greater carotid stenosis. Patients who have a stroke in evolution or have recently had a stroke are not good candidates for the procedure. Surgery at this time could cause an infarcted area of the brain to hemorrhage when its blood supply is suddenly increased. In addition, there is a low success rate for those patients who have total occlusion of the internal carotid arteries.
Patient Care. Immediately after surgery special monitoring is necessary to assess the patient's neurologic status, including level of consciousness, orientation, and motor activity, especially on the side opposite the surgery. Because of the location of the surgical incision, an enlarging hematoma can rapidly produce respiratory distress. Aspiration also is possible because a hematoma can obstruct the trachea and damage the laryngeal nerve, preventing closure of the glottis.

Crucial observations include evaluation of neck size, noting the patient's ability to swallow, close observation and measurement of drainage, and measurement of respiratory rate and character. A tracheostomy tray and suction apparatus should be available even after the patient is transferred from the recovery room or intensive care unit. Neurologic assessment is necessary to detect complications associated with postoperative cerebral ischemia and cranial nerve damage. Because ischemia of the myocardium is also a possibility, continuous electrocardiograph monitoring is required. Since blood pressure may be increased by surgery, postoperative hypertension is not uncommon.
 Carotid endarterectomy. Plaques are removed from the artery to improve blood flow. Modified from Black and Matassarin-Jacobs, 2001.
carotid sinus syndrome syncope sometimes associated with convulsive seizures due to overactivity of the carotid sinus reflex. In certain susceptible persons the carotid sinus is too easily stimulated and symptoms are produced by sudden turning of the head or the wearing of a tight collar. Transient attacks of numbness or weakness of the face, arm, or leg, headache, and in some cases aphasia may also occur. The condition most commonly affects older males and may be a cause of unexplained falls. Diagnosis can be confirmed by a gentle massage of the carotid sinus area of a patient under monitoring. asystole for longer than 3 seconds or a reduction in systolic blood pressure of more than 500 mm Hg are considered positive indications. The syndrome can be subdivided into cardioinhibitory, vasodepressor, and mixed types. Dual chamber cardiac pacing is indicated in the cardioinhibitory and mixed types. Patients who have this condition should be educated to avoid triggering events.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ca·rot·id

(ka-rot'id),
Pertaining to any carotid structure.
[G. karōtides, the carotid arteries, fr. karoō, to put to sleep (because compression of the c. artery results in unconsciousness)]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

carotid

(kə-rŏt′ĭd)
n.
Either of the two major arteries, one on each side of the neck, that carry blood to the head.
adj.
Of or relating to either of these arteries.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ca·rot·id

(kă-rot'id)
Pertaining to any carotid structure.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ca·rot·id

(kă-rot'id)
Pertaining to any carotid structure.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Carotid body tumors: Review of a 20-year experience.
Resection of carotid body tumors: Results of an evolving surgical technique.
Carotid body tumors grow slowly and remain asymptomatic until they reach up to a certain size.
Recent studies have shown that radiotherapy is useful in the treatment of carotid body tumors.16 Therefore, for regional lymph node metastasis of large, recurrent and malignant CBTs are recommended to be treated with radiotherapy.3
Current concepts for the surgical management of carotid body tumor. Am J Surg 2006; 191:104-10.
Surgical mass resection and internal carotid artery reconstruction is the treatment of choice for carotid body tumors, especially when the tumor is small because decrease risk of neurological post-surgery complications.
In conclusion carotid body tumors are possible causes of lateral neck masses.
Familial carotid body tumors: case report and epidemiologic review.
The four carotid body tumors were categorized according to the Shamblin classification system) (22) There was 1 type I tumor, 2 type II tumors (figures 1 and 2), and 1 type III tumor.
(1) On angiography, a carotid body tumor appears as a hypervascular mass at the carotid bifurcation; it is characterized by tumor blush and splaying of the internal and extemal carotid arteries.
These images demonstrated the classic findings of a carotid body tumor. The patient underwent preoperative embolization and an uneventful subadventitial dissection of a 3-cm carotid body tumor (figure 2).
Carotid body tumors typically present as painless neck masses just lateral to the tip of the hyoid bone.