carotid body


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Related to carotid body: aortic body, carotid body tumor

ca·rot·id bod·y

[TA]
a small epithelioid structure located just above the bifurcation of the common carotid artery on each side. It consists of granular principal cells and nongranular supporting cells, a sinusoidal vascular bed, and a rich network of sensory fibers of the glossopharyngeal nerve. It serves as a chemoreceptor organ responsive to lack of oxygen, excess of carbon dioxide, and increased hydrogen ion concentration.

carotid body

n.
A chemoreceptor that is a body of vascular tissue near the bifurcations of the carotid arteries. It monitors changes in the oxygen content of the blood and helps to control respiratory activity.

carotid body

Etymology: Gk, karos + AS, bodig
a small structure containing neural tissue at the bifurcation of the carotid arteries. It monitors the pressure and oxygen content of the blood and therefore assists in regulating respiration.

ca·rot·id bod·y

(kă-rot'id bod'ē) [TA]
A small epithelioid structure located just above the bifurcation of the common carotid artery on each side. It serves as a chemoreceptor organ responsive to oxygen lack, carbon dioxide excess, and increased hydrogen ion concentration.
Synonym(s): intercarotid body.

carotid body

A chemical receptor, situated at the first branch of each carotid artery, that monitors oxygen levels in the blood and regulates the rate of breathing accordingly.
Carotid bodyclick for a larger image
Fig. 93 Carotid body . Location.

carotid body

an area of gland-like tissue situated near the joining of the external CAROTID ARTERY to the common carotid which acts as a CHEMORECEPTOR (see Fig. 93. When blood-oxygen concentration levels are low and/or the concentration of carbon dioxide is high, the carotid body is stimulated to produce nervous impulses which are transmitted to the respiratory centre in the hindbrain, thus influencing BREATHING rate and, in turn, heart rate.

ca·rot·id bod·y

(kă-rot'id bod'ē) [TA]
Small epithelioid structure located just above the bifurcation of the common carotid artery on each side.

carotid

relating to the carotid artery, the principal artery of the neck. See Table 9.

carotid body
a small neurovascular structure lying in the bifurcation of the common carotid arteries, containing chemoreceptors that monitor oxygen content in blood and help to regulate respiration. Called also glomus caroticum.
carotid body tumors
usually unilateral nonfunctional adenoma, chemodectoma, nonchromaffin paraganglioma, or locally invasive carcinoma which may cause deviation of the trachea.
carotid canal
transmits the internal carotid artery to the cranial cavity through the pars petrosa of the temporal bone.
carotid sheath
contains the common carotid artery, internal jugular vein and vagosympathetic trunk.
carotid sinus
a dilatation of the proximal portion of the internal carotid or distal portion of the common carotid artery, containing in its wall pressoreceptors which are stimulated by changes in blood pressure.
carotid sinus reflex
slowing of the heart rate when pressure is applied over the carotid sinus.
carotid sinus syndrome
syncope sometimes associated with convulsive seizures due to overactivity of the carotid sinus reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among imaging studies, the Color Flow Duplex Scanning (CFDS) is the first for the diagnosis of carotid body tumor and for differential diagnosis, with a high accuracy rate of about 94%.
The histological appearance of a carotid body paraganglioma is not a reliable guide to its propensity for malignant behavior due to the poor correlation between histology and tumor behaviour.
Some authors (13) believe that the diagnosis of carotid body tumor with ultrasounds is practically made when a mass is present within the carotid bifurcation and there is demonstated that the mass is single or bilateral.
Paraganglioma of the vagus nerve mimicking as a carotid body tumor.
Parathyroid carcinoma radiographically mimicking a carotid body tumour.
The four carotid body tumors were categorized according to the Shamblin classification system) (22) There was 1 type I tumor, 2 type II tumors (figures 1 and 2), and 1 type III tumor.
In our small series, the incidence of carotid body tumors was 44.
Histopathologic examination confirmed that it was a carotid body paraganglioma.
Intravagal paragangliomas can usually be differentiated from carotid body tumors by the site of origin.
Further, approximately 10 to 15 % of carotid body tumors recur.
Diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to carotid body tumors.