carotenoids


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ca·rot·e·noids

(ka-rot'e-noydz),
Generic term for a class of carotenes and their oxygenated derivatives (xanthophylls) consisting of 8 isoprenoid units (thus, tetraterpenes) joined so that the orientation of these units is reversed at the center, placing the two central methyl groups in a 1,6 relationship in contrast to the 1,5 of the others. All carotenoids may be formally derived from the acyclic C40H56 structure known as lycopene, with its long central chain of conjugated double bonds by hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, oxidation, cyclization, or combinations of these. Included as carotenoids are some compounds arising from certain rearrangements or degradations of the carbon skeleton, but not retinol and related C20 compounds. The nine-carbon end groups may be acyclic with 1,2 and 5,6 double bonds or cyclohexanes with a single double bond at 5,6 or 5,4 or cyclopentanes or aryl groups; these are now designated by Greek letter prefixes preceding "carotene" (α and δ, which are used in the trivial names α-carotene and δ-carotene, are not used for that reason). Suffixes (for example, -oic acid, -oate, -al, -one, -ol) indicate certain oxygen-containing groups (for example, acid, ester, aldehyde, ketone, alcohol); all other substitutions appear as prefixes (for example, alkoxy-, epoxy-, hydro-). ). The configuration about all double bonds is trans unless cis and locant numbers appear. The prefix retro- is used to indicate a shift of one position of all single and double bonds; apo- indicates shortening of the molecule. Many carotenoids have anticancer activities.

ca·rot·e·noids

(kă-rot'ĕ-noydz)
Generic term for a class of carotenes and their oxygenated derivatives (xanthophylls).

carotenoids

A large group of yellow or orange pigments occurring in plants some of which have antioxidant properties. Some of the carotenoids are carotenes.

carotenoids

a group of yellow/orange pigments found in plants, animals and microorganisms, which includes CAROTENES (orange) and xanthophylls (yellow).

Carotenoids

Carotenoids are yellow to deep-red pigments.
Mentioned in: Vitamin A Deficiency
References in periodicals archive ?
Though you've probably heard that minimal processing is best when it comes to prepping your vegetables, in the case of carotenoid-rich veggies, chopping, pureeing and cooking actually help your body absorb those carotenoids better.
In this work that comes as a complementary study of a clinical trial starting in 2009 and ending in 2014, RRS measurements of skin carotenoids have been carried out in breast cancer (BC) operated patients, to research the oxidative stress associated with this condition and monitor eventual variations from a five-year-long treatment aimed at reducing BC risk and recurrence by combining conventional therapies with dietary intervention [27, 28].
Now research has discovered that eggs may be the best way to extract carotenoids from veggies.
Among the major drivers, rising cases of cancer and eye-related diseases can trigger the carotenoids market growth.
(i) Use tomato varieties with altered carotenoid content and determine carotenoid levels compared to their derived apocarotenoids.
Peaches lack genetic diversity, a substantial roadblock for breeders, but determining how carotenoids and the chemical compounds created during their biosynthesis affect flavor may give breeders new options.
Besides macronutrient like, protein, starch and oil, there are many other micronutrients in maize grain particularly carotenoids. Maize kernel has both pro-vitamin A carotenoids and non-provitamin A carotenoids.
Broccoli contains carotenoids that are yellow, orange or deep red (these colors are invisible because they are masked by chlorophyll's green reflection of sunlight).
Nutritional supplementation with carotenoids, especially lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin which compose the macular pigment, is crucial; levels of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) can be measured in the consulting room using established techniques.
Historically, the most studied carotenoids (and those most often used in carotenoid-linked health- and food-related claims) have been colored carotenoids such as lycopene, [beta]-carotene, astaxanthin, or lutein.
Carotenoids, especially lutein and zeaxanthin, are functional pigments that are present in many kinds of plants, animals, and microorganisms [1].