carotenoid

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carotenoid

 [kah-rot´ĕ-noid]
1. any member of a group of red, orange, or yellow pigmented lipids found in carrots, sweet potatoes, green leaves, and some animal tissues; examples are the carotenes, lycopene, and xanthophyll.
2. marked by yellow color.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ca·rot·e·noid

(ka-rot'e-noyd),
1. Resembling carotene; having a yellow color.
2. One of the carotenoids.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

carotenoid

(kə-rŏt′n-oid′)
n.
Any of a class of yellow to red pigments, including the carotenes and the xanthophylls.
adj.
Of or relating to such a pigment.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

carotenoid

Any of a family of nutrients that are precursors of vitamin A and have antioxidant activity. While beta carotene1 is the best known of the group, long assumed to be responsible for the reduction of strokes, cardiovascular disease and cancersm 600 carotenoids have been identified. 40 are common in fruits and vegetables with the highest concentration in tomato juice, followed by kale, collard greens, spinach, sweet potato, chard, watermelon, carrots and pumpkin; high carotenoid consumption is associated with a decreased incidence of bladder, colon, lung and skin cancers, as well as growth of cancer cells in general.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

carotenoid

Nutrition A vitamin A precursor with antioxidant activity; although beta carotene is the best known of the group, 600 carotenoids have been identified; 40 are common in fruits and vegetables; high carotenoid consumption is associated with ↓ risk of bladder, colon, lung, skin CAs and growth of CA cells. See Beta carotene, Vitamin A.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ca·rot·e·noid

(kă-rot'ĕ-noyd)
1. Resembling carotene; having a yellow color.
2. One of the carotenoids.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Grevsen, 2001 HPLC Determination of Chlorophyll and Carotenoid Pigments in Processed Green Pea Cultivars (Pisum sativum L) J.
Xanthophylls are one of two classes of carotenoid pigments which are also beneficial as a natural pigment source and have many commercial applications.
Yellows and reds often arise from carotenoid pigments such as beta- carotene.
The macula contains two carotenoid pigments, lutein and zeaxanthin, which are related to vitamin A.
Depth distribution of the carotenoid pigments and lipids of some oceanic animals.
But experts from the United States, the UK, Germany and the Netherlands today said the foods best for eye health were those that contained the two antioxidant carotenoid pigments lutein and zeaxanthin.
Likewise, females that are fed abundant red pigments during molt display maximum female coloration (but always drabber than male coloration), whereas those fed a diet deficient in carotenoid pigments molt plumage with little detectable carotenoid coloration (Hill 1993a).
As part of raw ingredient analysis, the lab workers extract and analyze the carotenoid pigments and xanthophylls from corn and marigold products.
Carotenoid pigments (including yellow to orange xanthophylls) turn leaves of plants like lindera and summersweet bright yellow.
Research team leader and science research specialist II Christopher Andrew Bilbao said that during the development process, his group "standardized the methods of extracting and purifying the carotenoid pigments" of the tiesa.