carotenoid

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carotenoid

 [kah-rot´ĕ-noid]
1. any member of a group of red, orange, or yellow pigmented lipids found in carrots, sweet potatoes, green leaves, and some animal tissues; examples are the carotenes, lycopene, and xanthophyll.
2. marked by yellow color.

ca·rot·e·noid

(ka-rot'e-noyd),
1. Resembling carotene; having a yellow color.
2. One of the carotenoids.

carotenoid

/ca·rot·e·noid/ (kah-rot´ĕ-noid)
1. any of a group of red, orange, or yellow pigmented polyisoprenoid hydrocarbons synthesized by prokaryotes and higher plants and concentrating in animal fat when eaten; examples are β-carotene, lycopene, and xanthophyll.
2. marked by yellow color.

provitamin A carotenoids  carotenoids, particularly the carotenes, that can be converted to vitamin A in the body.

carotenoid

(kə-rŏt′n-oid′)
n.
Any of a class of yellow to red pigments, including the carotenes and the xanthophylls.
adj.
Of or relating to such a pigment.

carotenoid

[kərot′ənoid]
any of a group of red, yellow, or orange highly unsaturated pigments that are found in foods such as carrots, sweet potatoes, and leafy green vegetables. Many of these substances, such as carotene, are used in the formation of vitamin A in the body, whereas others, including lycopene and xanthophyll, show no vitamin A activity. Also spelled carotinoid.

carotenoid

Any of a family of nutrients that are precursors of vitamin A and have antioxidant activity. While beta carotene1 is the best known of the group, long assumed to be responsible for the reduction of strokes, cardiovascular disease and cancersm 600 carotenoids have been identified. 40 are common in fruits and vegetables with the highest concentration in tomato juice, followed by kale, collard greens, spinach, sweet potato, chard, watermelon, carrots and pumpkin; high carotenoid consumption is associated with a decreased incidence of bladder, colon, lung and skin cancers, as well as growth of cancer cells in general.

carotenoid

Nutrition A vitamin A precursor with antioxidant activity; although beta carotene is the best known of the group, 600 carotenoids have been identified; 40 are common in fruits and vegetables; high carotenoid consumption is associated with ↓ risk of bladder, colon, lung, skin CAs and growth of CA cells. See Beta carotene, Vitamin A.

ca·rot·e·noid

(kă-rot'ĕ-noyd)
1. Resembling carotene; having a yellow color.
2. One of the carotenoids.

carotenoid

1. any member of a group of red, orange or yellow pigmented polyisoprenoid lipids found in carrots, sweet potatoes, green leaves and some animal tissues; examples are the carotenes, lycopene and xanthophyll.
2. marked by yellow color.
3. lipochrome.

carotenoid pigments
contribute to the yellow staining of fatty tissues especially in horses, Channel Island breeds of cattle and old cats.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, the decreased concentration of carotenoid pigments is consistent with the observations of Obermuller et al.
As well as providing the necessary colour, carotenoid pigments are known to be excellent antioxidants and many nutritionists recommend increased consumption of foods containing these types of substances (eg fruit and peppers) because of their beneficial effects.
annuum 'Bola' with rapid, high temperature oven drying accounted for approximately 25% loss in carotenoid pigment content (Minguez-Mosquera et al.
Depth distribution of the carotenoid pigments and lipids of some oceanic animals.
But experts from the United States, the UK, Germany and the Netherlands today said the foods best for eye health were those that contained the two antioxidant carotenoid pigments lutein and zeaxanthin.
Likewise, females that are fed abundant red pigments during molt display maximum female coloration (but always drabber than male coloration), whereas those fed a diet deficient in carotenoid pigments molt plumage with little detectable carotenoid coloration (Hill 1993a).
As part of raw ingredient analysis, the lab workers extract and analyze the carotenoid pigments and xanthophylls from corn and marigold products.
Carotenoid pigments (including yellow to orange xanthophylls) turn leaves of plants like lindera and summersweet bright yellow.
Astaxanthin (AX) is one of the marine carotenoid pigments, which possess powerful biological antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties.
When the green veil is pulled off, other colors are revealed: orange, from carotenoid pigments and yellow, from another class of carotenoid pigment called xanthophylls.
Though red and yellow vegetables are most associated with health-promoting carotenoid pigments, green beans also belong to those ranks.