carotene


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Related to carotene: alpha carotene

carotene

 [kar´o-tēn]
a yellow or red pigment found in many dark green, leafy, and yellow vegetables such as collards, turnips, carrots, sweet potatoes, and squash, as well as in yellow fruit, milk, egg yolk, and body fat; it is a chromolipoid hydrocarbon existing in four forms (α-, β-, γ-, and δ-carotene), which can be converted into vitamin A in the body.
beta carotene
1. the β isomer of carotene.
2. a preparation of this substance administered orally to prevent vitamin A deficiency and to reduce photosensitivity in patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria. Written also betacarotene and β-carotene.

car·o·tene

(kar'ō-tēn),
A member of a class of carotenoids, yellow-red pigments (lipochromes) widely distributed in plants and animals, notably in carrots, and closely related in structure to the xanthophylls and lycopenes and to the open-chain squalene; of particular interest in that they include precursors of the vitamins A (provitamin A carotenoids). Chemically, they consist of 8 isoprene units in a symmetric chain with the 2 isoprenes at each end cyclized, forming either α-carotene or β-carotene (γ-carotene has only one end cyclized). The cyclic ends of β-carotene are identical β-ioninelike structures; thus, on oxidative fission, β-carotene yields 2 molecules of vitamin A. The cyclic ends of α-carotene differ in that one is an α-ionone and the other a β-ionone; on fission, α-carotene, like γ-carotene, yields 1 molecule of vitamin A (a β-ionone derivative).

carotene

/car·o·tene/ (kar´o-tēn) one of four isomeric pigments (α-, β-, γ-, and δ-carotene), having colors from violet to red-yellow to yellow and occurring in many dark green, leafy, and yellow vegetables and yellow fruits. They are fat-soluble, unsaturated hydrocarbons that can be converted into vitamin A in the body; in humans the β- isomer (β- or beta carotene) is the major precursor of this vitamin.
beta carotene  the β- isomer of carotene; a preparation is used to prevent vitamin A deficiency and to reduce the severity of photosensitivity in patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria.

carotene

(kăr′ə-tēn′) also

carotin

(-tĭn)
n.
An orange-yellow to red crystalline pigment, C40H56, found in animal tissue and certain plants, such as carrots and squash. It exists in several isomeric forms and is converted to vitamin A in the liver.

carotene

[kar′ətin]
Etymology: L, carota, carrot
a red or orange organic compound found in carrots, sweet potatoes, egg yolk, and leafy vegetables, such as beet greens, spinach, and broccoli. Beta-carotene, the most common form of carotene, is a provitamin and in the body is converted to vitamin A. See also vitamin A.

car·o·tene

(kar'ō-tēn)
Yellow-red pigments (lipochromes) widely distributed in plants and animals, notably in carrots, and closely related in structure to the xanthophylls and lycopenes and to the open-chain squalene; they include precursors of vitamin A (provitamin A carotenoids).

carotene

One of a group of orange pigments found in carrots and some other vegetables. Beta-carotene (provitamin A) is converted to vitamin A in the liver. This vitamin is needed for normal growth and development of bone and skin, for the development of the fetus and for the proper functioning of the RETINA.

carotene

an orange plant pigment of the CAROTENOID group which is usually present in the CHLOROPLASTS, and sometimes occurs in pigment-containing structures called CHROMOPLASTS which are found in yellow/orange leaves, vegetables and fruits. Carotene is also found in green leaves but the colour is masked; the orange colour can be seen in autumn leaves as the chlorophylls break down first. Carotene is necessary for the production of vitamin A in man and has an ABSORPTION SPECTRUM of about 450 nm. Carotene acts as an accessory pigment, passing energy to chlorophyll a for use in LIGHT REACTIONS and protecting chlorophyll from excessive light, and from oxidation by the oxygen produced in PHOTOSYNTHESIS.

carotene

plant or animal-derived yellow-red pigments; vitamin A precursors

carotene,

n an orange- or red-colored pigment found in plants, which is convertible into vitamin A by the body.

car·o·tene

(kar'ō-tēn)
Yellow-red pigments widely distributed in plants and animals, notably in carrots; include precursors of vitamin A.

carotene (ker´ətēn),

n an orange pigment found in carrots, leafy vegetables, and other foods that may be converted to vitamin A in the body.

carotene

a yellow or red pigment from carrots, sweet potatoes, milk and body fat, egg yolk, etc.; it is a chromolipoid hydrocarbon existing in several forms. α-, β- and γ-carotene are provitamins which can be converted into vitamin A in the body by all animals except cats. β-carotene is the most important because of a quantitatively greater activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
From our work it could be suggested that beta- carotene act as a potential antioxidative agent which could improve AFB1 induced oxidative stress resulting apoptosis.
Beta carotene has been thought of value to humans and other species because of excellent antioxidant properties9 and has been shown to guard against APAP-induced hepatic damage cancers and heart diseases1012.
The analytic imprecision of this carotene assay is 6.
But those involved in manufacturing and selling vitamins and nutritional supplements contend that the latest findings are reminiscent of the so-called "Finnish study" of 1994 that looked at over 29,000 men who were smokers and found that there was a slight increase in the death rate among those who had taken beta carotene.
Research shows that the antioxidant beta carotene possesses "cancer preventing compounds," according to Dr.
More than 29,000 middle-aged male smokers, divided into four groups, were given beta carotene (20 milligrams daily) alone, vitamin E (50 milligrams) alone, both nutrients, or a placebo for an average of six years.
There is, however, still no conclusive evidence that beta carotene is itself responsible for the decreased rates of cancer in persons with vegetable-rich diets.
Variation in the carotene composition of fruits and vegetables has been widely reported in the literature, as a result of the effects of several factors such as the genetic, soil type, climatic conditions and the exposure to sun light (RODRIGUEZ-AMAYA, 1999).
Beta] - carotene 10% CWS Star - a high performance and natural-source [Beta] - carotene formulation for the colouration and fortification of food and beverages.
Objective: To study the protective role of beta carotene against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.
Traditional storage methods such as storage in bags, pits and open ground have not been evaluated to determine their impact on the retention of beta carotene content as well as its bioaccessibility.
A randomized trial of beta carotene supplementation and cognitive function in men: The Physicians' Health Study II.