carob

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carob

The sweet pulp of the Mediterranean evergreen leguminous tree, Ceratonia siliquia, a chocolate surrogate for those who are allergic to chocolate or adhere wish to eliminate chocolate from their diet. Carob is high in palm kernel oil (i.e., a “tropical oil”) and therefore atherogenic; it is also high in sodium, and thus linked to hypertension.
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EU additive E410 on a food product will indicate it contains carob. The main action of carob is to act as a binding agent and it is found in the following popular products: ice cream, yoghurt, mayonnaise, jams, sweets, sauces, tinned and packaged soups and diet foods.
The post Celebrating carobs appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
Currently, Petridou said, the chemistry department of the university is conducting research on which kinds of products are viable, and the biological scientist is investigating if carobs can prevent cancer.
Carob flour and extracts are also used as ingredients in food products.
At one time, there were reportedly more than two million carob trees in Cyprus, and in the 1900s, their pods were among Cyprus' main exports, used as livestock feed, in sweets and medicines and even as an aphrodisiac.
Carobs are believed to be the natural habitat of a beetle unique to Cyprus and considered critically endangered.
and carob was considered as 'the black gold of Cyprus' since it was very important for the local economy as the island was making huge exports," said Menelaos Stavrinides, assistant professor at CUT and national coordinator of the Agrolife project which is co-funded by the EU's LIFE+ programme.
Ion uptake, assimilation and allocation studies in young and mature carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) plants, p.
The carob mill building is a large space set out with many green and white check tables in a traditional rustic Cypriot style.
An Ethiopian immigrant or a Bedouin would likely accept our explanation; they would be familiar with carob and homemade molasses.
The village of Anogyra was once a main carob-grower and it is still very famous for its traditional sweet -- pasteli -- which is made from carob syrup and is produced traditionally in the village.