carnitine


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carnitine

 [kahr´nĭ-tēn]
a derivative of betaine found in skeletal muscle and liver; it is necessary for the mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids.

car·ni·tine

(kar'ni-tēn),
A trimethylammonium (betaine) derivative of γ-amino-β-hydroxybutyrate, formed from Nε,Nε,Nε-trimethyllysine and from γ-butyrobetaine; the l-isomer is a thyroid inhibitor found in muscle, liver, and meat extract; l-carnitine is an acyl carrier with respect to the mitochondrial membrane and thus stimulates fatty acid oxidation.
Synonym(s): BT factor, vitamin BT
[L. caro carn-, flesh + ine]

carnitine

(kär′nĭ-tēn′)
n.
A compound that functions in fatty acid metabolism by transporting fatty acids into mitochondria for energy production. It is naturally produced in the body and is present in many animal products, especially red meat. It is also sold as a dietary supplement for its purported health benefits.

carnitine

Chemistry
An essential amino acid that transports long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for breakdown to CO2 or ketone bodies; it acts as an acyl (fatty acid carrier). Carnitine is endogenous (synthesised in the liver and kidneys from lysine and methionine) or exogenous (from red meat and dairy products).

Fringe nutrition
Carnitine allegedly enhances athletic performance, prevents heart disease, controls weight and has anti-ageing properties; current data does not support these assertions.

car·ni·tine

(kahr'ni-tēn)
A trimethylammonium (betaine) derivative of gamma-amino-beta-hydroxybutyric acid, formed from NE,NE,NE -trimethyllsine and from gamma-butyrobetaine; the l-isomer is a thyroid inhibitor found in muscle, liver, and meat extracts; l-carnitine is an acyl carrier with respect to the mitochondrial membrane; it thus stimulates fatty acid oxidation.
[G. karnin, an alkali derived from meat]

car·ni·tine

(kahr'ni-tēn)
Compound found in dairy and meat that stimulates fatty acid oxidation.
[G. karnin, an alkali derived from meat]
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally, the dietary carnitine supplementation is expected to decrease the lipid deposition and increase the protein deposition in fish, due to its action in lipid metabolism (Harpaz, 2005; Mohseni & Ozorio, 2014).
Basic metabolic treatment of GA-I is using low lysine diet for reduction of glutaryl-CoA, GA and 3-OH-GA and carnitine supplementation to prevent carnitine depletion.
Blood samples were obtained by cardiac puncture, and the plasma was separated by centrifugation and then stored at -80[degrees]C for subsequent measurement of carnitine by a radioenzymatic assay using carnitine acetyl-transferase and [[sup.14]C]acetyl-CoA [11].
The patient was transitioned from IV to PO carnitine, 400 mg TDS, and was commenced on bisoprolol 2.5 mg mane and perindopril 2.5 mg mane.
Carnitine might not only impact energy metabolism but may also have an effect on lipoprotein metabolism such as triglyceride, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and high density lipoprotein (HDL).
Despite the occurrence of secondary carnitine deficiency, the clinical significance of monitoring plasma carnitine concentrations and the role of supplementation is largely unknown.
"We, much to our surprise, then discovered that carnitine increases the kill capacity of doxorubicin ten-fold against rodent ovarian cells in culture.
To our knowledge, no study has been conducted documenting free carnitine (FC) and acylcarnitine (AC) esters in FMF patients.
Carnitine, found in meat and other foods, is also manufactured in the body from the amino acid lysine.