carmine dye

carmine dye

[kär′min]
Etymology: AR, qirmize + AS, deag
a red coloring substance, produced by the addition of alum to an extract of cochineal, used for staining histological specimens. Also called carmalum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Picro bottles indigo carmine dye for microscopic observation of sperm by staining christmas tree.
Echebiri said he felt the test would be a good noninvasive alternative to the invasive standard test of indigo carmine dye injection into the amniotic cavity.
Popsicle-induced anaphylaxis due to carmine dye allergy.
Here we developed the electrochemical method for the degradation of indigo carmine dye with Ru[III] doped Pt electrode(RudPt) [9,10].
To ensure integrity of the repair and to detect the presence of any other bladder injuries, backfill the bladder with a sterile milk or indigo carmine dye through the Foley catheter.
Blue-green urine can also be caused by amitriptyline, carmine dye, triamterene, and methocarbamol (3).
Along the way, Baskes provides a concise but highly detailed economic history of the cochineal industry during its heyday in southern Mexico, telling the fascinating story of the production and marketing of this brilliant natural carmine dye made from the dessicated bodies of tiny insects which spend their life-cycle on prickly pear (nopal) cactus leaves.
Strips of bacon were slapped onto cheeks at night for a soft pink skin and, in the morning, Spanish papers of rouge - papers thickened with carmine dye - were rubbed on for extra colour.
The administration of IV dye such as indigo carmine dye should be used only after the surgical procedure is complete to provide clearer confirmation that the ureters are patent, compared with when it is given before or during the procedure.
Indigo carmine dye test was performed; when dye indicated a second, smaller hole, the gynecologist repaired it with a figure-of-8 stitch.