carminative

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carminative

 [kahr-min´ah-tiv]
1. relieving flatulence.
2. an agent that so acts.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·min·a·tive

(kar-min'ă-tiv),
1. Preventing the formation or causing the expulsion of flatus.
2. An agent that relieves flatulence.
[L. carmino, pp. -atus, to card wool; special Mod. L. usage, to expel wind]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

carminative

(kär-mĭn′ə-tĭv, kär′mə-nā′-)
adj.
Inducing the expulsion of excess gas from the stomach and intestines.
n.
A carminative drug or agent.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

carminative

Herbal medicine
noun A herb with a pleasant taste or odour, which is soothing to the gastrointestinal tract and reduces bloating or flatulence.

Examples
• Angelica—Angelica archangelica.
• Anise—Pimpinella anisum.
• Balm—Melissa officinalis.
• Cinnamon—Cinnamomum zeylandicum.
• Cloves—Eugenia carophyllus.
• Dill—Anethum graveolens.
• Fennel—Foeniculum dulce.
• Ginger—Zingiber officinale.
• Peppermint—Mentha piperita.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·min·a·tive

(kahr-min'ă-tiv)
An agent such as peppermint oil that is taken after a meal to facilitate belching through relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter, thereby averting passage of swallowed air into the intestine as flatus.
[L. carmino, pp. -atus, to card wool; special Mod. L. usage, to expel wind]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

carminative

1. Having the power to relax muscle rings (sphincters) so as to release gas and relieve flatulence.
2. A drug having this property.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

car·min·a·tive

(kahr-min'ă-tiv)
Agent to prevent formation or cause expulsion of flatus.
[L. carmino, pp. -atus, to card wool; special Mod. L. usage, to expel wind]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Ginger root is both a carminative and antispasmodic.
(Yayla cayi) is used as a stimulant, carminative, and for stomachache, for cough and also as a herbal tea [1].
One herbal combination formula that has been studied in IBS contains the bitter candytuft lberis amara); a cholagogue (celandine [Chelidonium majus] leaf and flower); carminatives (caraway [Carum carvi], peppermint [Mentha piperita], chamomile [Matricaria recutita]); an antiinflammatory (licorice [Glycyrrhiza spp.
Further studies on the correlation between biological activity and solubility of some carminatives I.
Antifoaming and carminative actions of volatile oils.
Varro Tyler, dean and professor emeritus of pharmacognosy (natural product pharmacy) at Purdue University, notes that most of the carminative oils in peppermint and other mints are relatively insoluble in water.
No wonder coriander helps soothe indigestion: Its essential oils are carminative, antiseptic, bactericidal, fungicidal and a muscle relaxant.
vulgare Carminative in traditional texts Foeniculum Selective Oestrogen (Bruckner 1993, Cook vulgare** Receptor Modulator?