Carjacking

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A class B felony (US) defined as the intentional or knowing taking of a motor vehicle from the possession of another by use of (1) a deadly weapon; or (2) force or intimidation
References in periodicals archive ?
Aurora dad jumps on hood, daughter falls out of car during carjacking
It's difficult to know how Detroit's carjackings rank nationally because many police agencies lump carjackings with all armed robberies in annual reports to the FBI.
"With each carjacking there was a shooting involved," he said.
A bruised and bandaged Anwar al-Bilkimy had appeared on television last week saying he was the victim of a carjacking and spoke of how gunmen beat him and stole 100,000 Egyptian pounds ($16,500).
The incidents may be linked to two earlier carjackings at Handforth Dean, close to where many celebrities do their shopping, say the police.
Carjackings peaked in 2001 when they accounted for 3.3% of retrieved vehicles.
The recent spate of highly publicised carjackings in Britain includes the stabbing to death of 25-year-old Timothy Robinson outside his home in Battersea, London, at the end of January and a woman company director who was punched unconscious before the carjackers jumped into her pounds 50,000 Mercedes and drove off in New Charlton, south-east London.
ACCORDING TO A BUREAU OF JUSTICE STATISTICS REPORT, AN AVERAGE OF 49,000 NON-FATAL CARJACKINGS OCCUR per year between 1992 and 1996.
As Anatole France said, "If fifty million people say a foolish thing, it is still a foolish thing." The falseness of Knotts' position should be evident since his home state of Florida had an immediate halt in carjackings as soon as the concealed handgun law was passed; carjackers switched to robbing tourists in rental cars from the airports.
Such reasoning is limitless and illogical."(172) Further, he stated, the Court was out of line in asserting that the petitioner's reading of [sections] 2119 would exclude from the statute the majority of the carjackings that Congress obviously meant to cover.(173) Justice Scalia argued that it is not implausible that Congress actually intended to narrow the statute's scope.(174) In closing his discussion of the intent issue, Justice Scalia stated that if Congress meant this statute to be construed broadly, it could have eliminated ambiguity by defining the offense as "carjacking under threat of death."(175)