cariostatic


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car·i·o·stat·ic

(kār'ē-ō-stat'ik),
Exerting an inhibitory action on the progress of dental caries.

car·i·o·stat·ic

(kar'ē-ō-stat'ik)
Referring to a material or procedure that prevents or retards the formation and progression of dental caries.
[L. caries, decay, + G. statikos, bringing to a stop]

car·i·o·stat·ic

(kar'ē-ō-stat'ik)
Exerting inhibitory action on progress of dental caries.
[L. caries, decay, + G. statikos, bringing to a stop]
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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the ethanol present in chicha is antimicrobial, with one study finding ethanol to be as cariostatic as fluoride (Luoma 1972).
Tenuta, How to Maintain a Cariostatic Fluoride Concentration in the Oral Environment, Advances in Dental Research, 20, 13 (2008).
Evidence over the last 20 years has demonstrated that the cariostatic effect of F is topical on the tooth surface and ingestion is not required [116-118].
Lockwood, "Fluoride varnishes: a review of their clinical use, cariostatic mechanism, efficacy and safety," The Journal of the American Dental Association, vol.
Invitro cariostatic effects of various iron supplements on the initiation of dental caries.
(17) Products containing cariostatic sugar alcohol, a bacteriostatic agent, such as xylitol or sorbitol, are recommended during waking hours to reduce the sensation of xerostomia and facilitate speech and swallowing.
Fluoride produces a cariostatic effect (reducing risk of dental caries) in all individuals by its presence in oral fluids such as saliva and dental plaque.
The statements dealt with the well-known problems, such as the cariostatic effect of fluoride, and some difficult issues, such as: inheritance of caries and caries dynamics (Table 4).
Tooth decay is still the most important problem in dentistry; different therapies have been proposed over time seeking little loss of healthy dental tissue, especially by using minimally invasive operative movements and by applying cariostatic substances such as 38% SDF, which has been used to minimize premature loss of temporary teeth affected by carious lesions, close to their stage of normal exfoliation.
The cariostatic benefit from water fluoridation is indisputable, but there has been debate over the past 60 years on possible adverse effects from fluoride on human health.