caring behaviors


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caring behaviors

actions characteristic of concern for the well-being of a patient, such as sensitivity, comforting, attentive listening, honesty, and nonjudgmental acceptance.

caring behaviors

The actions or responses of providing patient services.

Patient care

The following are the 10 highest-ranked caring behaviors, derived from nursing literature, then selected by nurses as evident in caring situations with patients: attentive listening, comforting, honesty, patience, responsibility, providing information so the patient can make an informed decision, touch, sensitivity, respect, addressing the patient by name.

See also: behavior
References in periodicals archive ?
Students learn caring behaviors through faculty modeling and values in the traditional classroom setting (Watson); however, these behaviors are difficult to portray in the online environment (Gallagher-Lepak, Reilly, & Killion, 2009).
In the surveys, consultants listed numerous ways they show caring behaviors to their clients to ease anxiety and establish trust.
In addition, African American students showed the sharpest decline across grade levels in their perceptions that teachers taking a personal interest in students demonstrated caring behavior.
and "Did you learn about caring behaviors in your teacher education program?
It is the continual expression of caring behaviors that develops the trusting relationships in which growth can occur.
The CFS was farther adapted to examine caring behaviors toward self (Lawrence & Kear, 2011), caring of co-workers (Lawrence & Kear, 2011), caring of preceptor (Testerman, 2011), caring of the organization (Harley et al.
Caring behaviors have been identified in studies involving nurses and patients, using such instruments as Wolf's Caring Behaviors Inventory (CBI) (Wolf et al.
The project hopes to identify the processes whereby caregiving is transmitted across generations, in the hope of accounting for heretofore mysterious continuities and discontinuities in the passing on of caring behaviors.
Although the process of nursing care and its influence on patient care outcomes are believed to be profound, there has been minimal study of the relationship between patient-perceived nurse caring behaviors and patient outcomes in the ambulatory surgery setting.
Caring behaviors are almost exclusively described in the context of an ongoing relationship rather than as a single generous act, such as helping a stranger who has fallen down in the hallway or on the street.
And it challenges clinicians to incorporate caring behaviors into their practice.
The revised Caring Behaviors Inventory (CBI) (Wolf et al.